posterior

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posterior

1. Zoology (of animals) of or near the hind end
2. Botany (of a flower) situated nearest to the main stem
3. Anatomy dorsal or towards the spine
4. the buttocks; rump

posterior

[pä′stir·ē·ər]
(zoology)
The hind end of an organism.
Toward the back, or hinder end, of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the way of priority and posteriority (tariq at-taqaddum iva-t-ta'ahhur).
Non-existence qua non-existence and existence qua existence do not possess the properties of priority and posteriority.
The a posteriority of these conditionals reflects the fact that further empirical information is required for their justification.
Of course, if we accept the posteriority of the consolatio ad Liviam (the date of which is uncertain, but the likeliest proposals do not go beyond the beginning of the Neronian period: cf.
Since we arrive at the knowledge of God through things other than God, the reality referred to by the names predicated of God and other things exists by priority in God according to his own mode, but the meaning of the name belongs to God by posteriority, and thus God is said to be named from his effects.
Means, result, condition, and purpose rhetorical relations were attested in the corpus Other rhetorical relations such circumstance (anteriority, posteriority, simultaneity), concession, and cause may also be attested in further research.
260) Lastly, Fortenbaugh offers reflections on Aristotle's analyses of mistaken versus correct constitutions, which refine reflections of Plato in the Laws by emphasizing the fact that distinct species of regimes aiming at common interest reflect priority and posteriority analogously to the application of "focal reference" to substance in the Metaphysics (pp.
Theologians, philosophers and scientists perceive and describe an aspect of this integral, systemic regularity in terms of a certain linear spatio-temporal order of priority and posteriority seen to be governing things and events in nature, some of which they posit as antecedent 'causes' ('substrate', 'substratum') for others, the consequent 'effects', whereas in reality, causal efficacy lies with God alone.
The results can be stated as follows, abridged and somewhat simplified: the form iparras denotes contemporaneity or posteriority in time relative to a reference point determined by the speaker; iprus denotes priority in time to such a reference point; iptaras denotes priority in time to one reference point simultaneously with posteriority in time to another reference point derived from context.
But if it is so, there ought to be time, since the definition of time depends, at least in part, on the difference of anteriority and posteriority within movement.
And included in the totality of what is other than God are place and time, for place refers to open space (al-fada), spatial domain (al-hayyiz) and the extended void (al-faragh al-mumtadd), whereas time refers to the duration (al-muddah) by virtue of which priority (al-qabliyyah) and posteriority (al-ba diyyah) occur.