postilion


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postilion

, postillion
a person who rides the near horse of the leaders in order to guide a team of horses drawing a coach
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
"Don't you see your lad talking with the postilion?"
"Now give ten crowns to the postilion," said D'Artagnan, in the tone he would have employed in commanding a maneuver; "two lads to bring up the two first bags, two to bring up the two last, -- and move, Mordioux!
"The postilion of this relay is deaf and dumb, monseigneur."
"Give the postilion orders to conceal the carriage in one of the side avenues."
Heralded by a courier in advance, and by the cracking of his postilions' whips, which twined snake-like about their heads in the evening air, as if he came attended by the Furies, Monsieur the Marquis drew up in his travelling carriage at the posting-house gate.
The postilions, with a thousand gossamer gnats circling about them in lieu of the Furies, quietly mended the points to the lashes of their whips; the valet walked by the horses; the courier was audible, trotting on ahead into the dun distance.
The valet had put her away from the door, the carriage had broken into a brisk trot, the postilions had quickened the pace, she was left far behind, and Monseigneur, again escorted by the Furies, was rapidly diminishing the league or two of distance that remained between him and his chateau.
The laquais a louange are sure to lose no opportunity of cheating you; and as for the postilions, I think they are pretty much alike all the world over.
The single gentleman, rather bewildered by finding himself the centre of this noisy throng, alighted with the assistance of one of the postilions, and handed out Kit's mother, at sight of whom the populace cried out, 'Here's another wedding!' and roared and leaped for joy.
He was far more curious, in every swerve of the carriage, and every cry of the postilions, than he had been since he quitted London.
Adolphe Adams Le Postilion de Lonjumeau (1836) is yet another forgotten gem on a string of rare operas seen over the last few years at Paris' Opera Comique.