postmortem


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postmortem

1. occurring after death
2. dissection and examination of a dead body to determine the cause of death

postmortem

[pōst′mȯrd·əm]
(computer science)
Any action taken after an operation is completed to help analyze that operation.
(medicine)
Occurring after death.
References in periodicals archive ?
Subsequent samples were taken in a similar fashion from the middle parts of both sides of the muscle at 45 min and 24 h postmortem. Muscle samples were trimmed free of fat and connective tissue and then snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored in -80[degrees]C for subsequent analyses.
They informed that during the year 2013, the department had done 1127 postmortems, 1201 postmortems in the year 2014 and 966 postmortems in 2015.
This paper describes the complex effects of pHu on beef quality characteristics from Chinese Yellow crossbreed cattle during postmortem aging and provides an explanation of how pHu affects beef tenderness and rate of tenderisation.
The body was returned to his family following the conclusion of the postmortem.
In bioarchaeology and in forensic work, there is a problem identifying perimortem from postmortem breaks in long bones.
Investigators normally will find postmortem lividity, or blood pooling, on the portion of the body or head lying on the bottom after drowning.
Nada mas lejos de la realidad la creencia de que los metodos diagnosticos modernos son tan precisos que la consulta postmortem nada puede mostrar que no haya sido identificado en vida del paciente.
This report is the first in which HMPV was the only pathogen identified from postmortem specimens from a patient with a fatal respiratory tract disease.
For each child, data were recorded on demographics, the cause of death assigned by the ME, and the results of metabolic screening using tandem MS and dried postmortem blood samples [dagger], if available.
Chief Medical Officer Sir Liam Donaldson said: 'This postmortem guidance seeks to strike a balance between the rights of families to choose whether to donate organs and tissue and meeting the needs of medical science and research.
His mother Julie Wilkinson, 39, and father Nick Williams, 35, from Winsford, discovered in September 2001 that their baby's organs had been kept by Alder Hey after his postmortem examination.