Postposition

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Postposition

 

a class of auxiliary words having the meaning of prepositions, but occurring postpositively, that is, after the words they govern. Postpositions are common in various languages, including the Finno-Ugric, Turkic, Mongolian, Caucasian, and Tunguso-Manchurian. Examples are seen in the Tatar tavlar arasïnda (“between the mountains”; arasïnda means “between”), the Chuvash shïv urla (“across the river”; urla means “across”), and the Hungarian a tábla mellett (“beside the board”; mellett means “beside”). Some postpositions may take a case ending, as can be seen by comparing the Zyrian pu vylyn (“on the tree”; locative case), pu vylyś (“away from the tree”; ablative case), and pu vylǝ (“onto the tree”; aditive case). In some instances, postpositions are also used as substantives and with an independent meaning, as in the Tatar ara (“space,” “interval”) and arasïnda (“between”) and the Udmurt vylyn (“on”) and vyl (“surface”).

References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, in (28) ma serves to code the "giver", in (29) to code the "receiver" of a change of possession as the postpositionally marked participant.
Ma also occurs to mark the postpositionally marked participant of some verbs of transfer of information.
For other verbs of transfer of information, either the person "asked" or the "information" can appear in postpositionally marked position, as in the case of makula 'ask, beg' in (31) and (32):
More difficult to assess is the use of ma to mark the postpositionally marked participants of certain verbs of psychological states.
Moreover, verbs of psychological state and related semantic domains allow a wide variation with respect to the post-position heading the postpositionally marked participant phrase.
12) Here, I am mainly concerned with the use of ra 'with' to mark the postpositionally marked participant of a three-place predicate as the Instrument of a transfer.
This strategy is reminiscent of the "double object", not of the prepositional variant of English, although the postpositionally marked participant clearly is not the resultant possessor of the transferred entity.