poststructuralism


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Related to poststructuralism: postmodernism

poststructuralism:

see deconstructiondeconstruction,
in linguistics, philosophy, and literary theory, the exposure and undermining of the metaphysical assumptions involved in systematic attempts to ground knowledge, especially in academic disciplines such as structuralism and semiotics.
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poststructuralism

a widely influential intellectual movement in France from the 1960s onwards, deriving from STRUCTURALISM but reinterpreting the latter's main assumptions about LANGUAGE and society as signifying systems. As such, poststructuralists utilized while also challenging the ascendancy of key structuralist theorists including SAUSSURE and LÉVI-STRAUSS. In the course of a root-and-branch questioning of traditional modes of philosophical and linguistic theorizing, they also challenged other major social theories, notably MARXISM. The major theorists most usually associated with poststructuralism are DERRIDA and FOUCAULT (see also LACAN). Central aspects of previous linguistic theory ‘deconstructured’ by poststructuralism, especially by Derrida, include:
  1. a questioning of the implications of linguistic conceptions of DIFFERENCE, seen especially in Derrida's challenge to what he regards as SAUSSURE's still ‘metaphysical’ presuppositions about the SUBJECT and LANGUAGE, the priority given to speech‘ over ‘writing’ – see DECONSTRUCTION;
  2. a view that writing, too (see TEXTS), is also questionable as a source of any ‘grounding’ for objectivity or culture, the major reason for this being that, in addition to the ‘arbitrary’ connection between SIGNIFIER AND SIGNIFIED (as for Saussure), the relation between signifiers (via ‘differences’) is equally suspect, given that signifiers are always 'slipping under other signifiers‘, with no final definition possible.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Lacanian chapters conclude highlighting the "points of connections" between poststructuralism, Derrida and Lacan (151-2).
Poststructuralism and its intellectual antecedents also seemed to play into a wider canvas that from the first origins of European formalism tracked the developments of high modernism in art and literature as parallel and intersecting conversations.
This work reflects both the influence of poststructuralism and the 'new geography' in their investigations of the dimensions of 'neoliberal spatial technologies, geographies of school exclusion, spatial readings of disability, and the spatial politics of educational privatization in the form of the US home schooling movement.
Making this case is difficult given that caricatures of Durkheim and of poststructuralism represent the two as poles apart.
Given the rich offerings in poststructuralism on blackness in contrast to the relatively sparse offerings from Marxist theory, I wonder why Young doesn't encourage his fellow travelers to examine how blackness operates in Marxist thought rather than try to abolish one of the few theoretical areas today where the concept of blackness enjoys such rich, varied debate.
This article extends these ideas by showing how feminist poststructuralism and queer theory are useful for understanding children's identity construction and transforming practice.
Although he admires poststructuralism and postanarchism, Newman is surprisingly critical of posthumanism, arguing that 'these developments should not be fetishised or seen as a form of liberation, as those harbingers of the "post-human" cyber age are wont to do' (43).
Time and geography; race and class; politics and sexuality; the critical developments of feminism, poststructuralism, and postcolonialism; academic theory and current affairs: all are caught up with conversational fluency in a cultural discourse that avows the origins of its own utterance, from a twenty-to-twenty-first century American/English female academic.
In chapter 9 the authors pronounce themselves 'deeply sympathetic to postmodernism in its hospitality to popular genres' and to poststructuralism 'in its stress on heterogeneity, difference, contradictoriness, and indeterminancy; in its drawing attention to fictive elements in scholarly, including historical, writing.
Nuttall permits himself a few preliminary and marginal swipes at current (and by now not-so-current) fashions in literary theory, especially the solipsism of poststructuralism and the "absurd" New Historicist view that "Shakespeare was locked into an undeveloped, savagely hierarchical political philosophy by the period in which he lived.
The section and the book conclude with Tamsin Lorraine's Deleuzian approach to feminism and poststructuralism.
First, they demonstrate a concrete and serious effort towards a synthesis of elements of conventional Southeast Asian Studies and poststructuralism that underpins Cultural Studies.