tricalcium phosphate

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tricalcium phosphate

[trī′kal·sē·əm ′fä‚sfāt]
(inorganic chemistry)
References in classic literature ?
We therefore got all our things on board the same evening, and the next morning were ready to sail: in the meantime, lying at anchor at some distance from the shore, we were not so much concerned, being now in a fighting posture, as well as in a sailing posture, if any enemy had presented.
Athelstane shared his captivity, his bridle having been seized, and he himself forcibly dismounted, long before he could draw his weapon, or assume any posture of effectual defence.
Or, perhaps, he would lift himself to a sitting posture, blink at the fire for an unintelligent moment, throw a swift glance at his prostrate companion, and then cuddle down again with a grunt of sleepy content.
I made it worse by the way I started to a sitting posture.
It was an elaborate bath, proceeding through many rooms, and combining many postures and applications.
I should have observed, that for an hour or more before they went off they were dancing, and I could easily discern their postures and gestures by my glass.
It is very simple," said Fisher, "when Boyle straightened himself from his stooping posture, something had happened which he had not noticed, which his enemy had not noticed, which nobody had noticed.
Then it was--with the very act of its announcing itself-- that her identity flared up in a change of posture.
I was struck with the singular posture he maintained.
Grasping the sill I pulled myself up to a sitting posture without looking into the building, and gazed down at the baffled animal beneath me.
He said something to his warriors explanatory of this singular posture of affairs, and in vindication, perhaps, of the pacific temper of his son-in-law.
Several tens of thousands of the slain lay in diverse postures and various uniforms on the fields and meadows belonging to the Davydov family and to the crown serfs- those fields and meadows where for hundreds of years the peasants of Borodino, Gorki, Shevardino, and Semenovsk had reaped their harvests and pastured their cattle.