pot-bound


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

pot-bound

(of a pot plant) having grown to fill all the available root space and therefore lacking room for continued growth
References in periodicals archive ?
Repotting: When roots become pot-bound, the bonsai should be removed and repotted.
Remove winter protection from containers and top-dress or replant pot-bound plants.
If they are winding round and round the base, they are obviously pot-bound which may hinder growth later on.
Evergreen pot-bound plants from last season should be re-potted in early April with fresh compost and new plants purchased for pots should be well-watered until established.
Like most ferns, they prefer to be pot-bound and will grow quite happily with a twice-daily misting over their leaves.
Once they become pot-bound, these plants will not increase in size - even if their root balls are scored prior to planting in the garden.
Houseplants actually enjoy being slightly pot-bound, as long as they're not getting throttled.
There is nothing new about container-grown plants failing when transplanted into the garden, the usual reason being that they are pot-bound, the roots spiralling around the inside of the container.
The trees die, or become pot-bound, or are vandalised, or they spread out and people trip over the roots and we have to pay compensation.
Should the container be thick with weed then this is a telltale sign of neglect and could suggest a plant that has been in the container for a long time and may be pot-bound.
Check that they are not pot-bound (all you can see is roots when you knock off the pot) and if they are, repot.
Although camellias do well when fairly pot-bound, it may also be time for a re-potting session.