potherb


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potherb

any plant having leaves, flowers, stems, etc., that are used in cooking for seasoning and flavouring or are eaten as a vegetable
References in periodicals archive ?
Big-sting nettle or in Persian gazaneh, is cooked in some parts of Iran and is eaten as a potherb. Sting nettle oil nourishes the hairs, and is used for rheumatoid arthritis, gout, eczema, and spasmodic contractions.
Mae o hefyd yn cael ei alw'n 'black potherb' yn Saesneg ac mae'r enw yna yn rhoi rhyw syniad i chi o un defnydd iddo fo.
Members of the family are also used as vegetables, potherb and salad.
The leaves of the turnip are used as a potherb and also as a livestock forage.
In Korea green perilla has mostly been grown for seed oil production and collaterally some leaves were used for potherb. However there has been a recent prominent new trend in green perilla production in Korea.
It was known to the ancient Egyptians and cultivated over 2,000 years ago as a potherb in Persia and the Indian sub-continent.
An annual potherb of the goosefoot family, it is a dark green plant with broad, fleshy and crinkled leaves.
I also now allow upland or field cress (Barbarea verna) to grow anywhere it volunteers--its leaves make a delicious and nutritious potherb. Burdock (Arctium lappa) furnishes edible roots and stems, and is also known to be an excellent detoxifier.
Today this attractive potherb is much easier to find, even showing up on some restaurant menus.
raspberry) Food uses [appetizer, soup, salad, stir-fry, potherb, and so on] (bee balm vs.
Dandelions were used in Europe for centuries as a medication, a potherb, and salad greens.