poultice

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poultice

Med a local moist and often heated application for the skin consisting of substances such as kaolin, linseed, or mustard, used to improve the circulation, treat inflamed areas, etc.

Poultice

 

a form of heat application to the skin and deeper lying tissues and organs. A poultice is made from coarsely ground vegetable matter that has mucous characteristics; linseed and Iceland moss are often used. The vegetable matter is brought to a boil and cooked until a doughy mass is formed. Dry poultices, made from such substances as heated ash, peat, or linseed, are also used. Paraffin and peat treatments and certain other forms of physiotherapy are more perfected heat procedures.

poultice

[′pōl·təs]
(medicine)
A soft mass of hot, moist material applied as an external counterirritant, analgesic, or antiseptic.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Arabic Rose Poultice Experience boasts 120 minutes of relaxation.
Copper and magnesium sulphate provides pain relief and hence magnesium sulphate was also used in making poultice (Auras, 2008; Gonzalez 1997).
Working around the shoulder and neck area, he then applies the poultices.
This is a hot poultice full body massage combined with a Ytsara siam sa facial for dehydrated and combination skin with use of unique thermal suite, costing EUR225.
When I was very small I fell on some scissors and, after district nurses couldn't heal it, my mother put a black treacle poultice on and it was clean and healing soon after.
Currently, analgesic poultices for ethical use are not distributing in China.
Give a pound of Epsom salts and apply poultices of bran and hops which should be kept hot by pouring on hot water occasionally.
Combined with a spiritual ceremony, these ground-up poultices are believed to take away stomachaches, arthritis, anxiety disorders, diabetes and even cancer, Taykwa Tagamou First Nation member Howard Archibald says.
Somehow Mama learned when to administer strong herbal teas, dispense medicine and apply hot or cold packs and various poultices.
What is certain, however is that the Romans were the first to commercially grow it as a crop and were probably the first to grow lavender on the Cotswolds to provide supplies for their soldiers Roman soldiers used it for its antiseptic qualities on war wounds, an application also used during the first world war with moss poultices when bandages ran short.
Frieda is good, too, at providing curious details to spice the dry historical facts, such as the measures Catherine took in order to become pregnant: prayers, medicine, magical potions which included draughts of mule's urine and stinking poultices and, finally, spying on the sexual antics of Henry and his mistress in order to find out what she might be doing wrong.
Just 10 days of a strict vegetarian diet and placing garlic poultices on my wound, and I was healed.