poultice

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poultice

Med a local moist and often heated application for the skin consisting of substances such as kaolin, linseed, or mustard, used to improve the circulation, treat inflamed areas, etc.

Poultice

 

a form of heat application to the skin and deeper lying tissues and organs. A poultice is made from coarsely ground vegetable matter that has mucous characteristics; linseed and Iceland moss are often used. The vegetable matter is brought to a boil and cooked until a doughy mass is formed. Dry poultices, made from such substances as heated ash, peat, or linseed, are also used. Paraffin and peat treatments and certain other forms of physiotherapy are more perfected heat procedures.

poultice

[′pōl·təs]
(medicine)
A soft mass of hot, moist material applied as an external counterirritant, analgesic, or antiseptic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Working around the shoulder and neck area, he then applies the poultices.
Currently, analgesic poultices for ethical use are not distributing in China.
QMY gran was a great believer in using poultices for inflammation.
In the afternoon, settle down to watch Attheraces, then it's back to the stables to feel a few legs and get the staff started on the poultices.
But the staff worked hard with saltwater and poultices and it all came out.
I am taking anti inflammatories and painkillers, but have been reading about cabbage poultices and wonder if this would help.
Precise methods of preparing remedies - usually as infusions, decoctions, poultices, tinctures and salves - are given along with the specific amounts to be administered and course of treatment.
With pills and powders, potions and poultices, the medicine man, the witch doctor, the shaman and the physician provide relief.
Crocus flowers and leaves steeped in boiling water were used as poultices for arthritic joints; the same with nettle leaves.
There are three ways to prepare a home remedy: teas, tinctures or poultices, said Ojai herbalist Amanda McQuade Crawford, a graduate of the National Institute of Medical Herbalists in Britain and founder of both the American Herbalists Guild and the College of Phytotherapy in Alberquerque, N.
Occasionally, medicines arrived from Montreal, but often the sisters made poultices, ointments and remedies of every description from the resources at hand: mint, pumpkin, rhubarb, black currants, milkweed, cherry bark, spruce sap, goldenrod, bloodroot, wild strawberry, and corn tassels.