hierarchy

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hierarchy:

see ministryministry,
in religion, term used to designate the clergy of Protestant churches, particularly those who repudiate the claims of apostolic succession. The ceremony by which the candidate receives the office of a minister is called ordination.
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 and orders, holyorders, holy
[Lat. ordo,=rank], in Christianity, the traditional degrees of the clergy, conferred by the Sacrament of Holy Order. The episcopacy, priesthood or presbyterate, and diaconate were in general use in Christian churches in the 2d cent.
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.

Hierarchy

An arrangement or system of ranking one above the other or arranged in a graded series or sequence such as size (large to small), shape (similar or dissimilar), and placement (emphasis or location).

Hierarchy

 

the ordering of parts or elements of a whole from the highest to the lowest.

The term “hierarchy” was introduced not earlier than the second half of the fifth century by Pseudo-Dionysius in his treatises The Celestial Hierarchy and The Ecclesiastical Hierarchy. Until the 19th century, it was used to describe the organization of the Christian church. The development of the conception of hierarchy in science began in the second half of the 19th century. In the social sciences, the conception of hierarchy was originally used to describe class-estate divisions in an antagonistic society (for example, feudal hierarchy) and to characterize the structure of authority, especially of bureaucracy. In contemporary bourgeois sociology, numerous research studies have been devoted to the hierarchy of prestige, the hierarchy of wealth, and the hierarchy of power and control as an expression of social stratification and of social inequality.

With the appearance of the general systems theory in the 20th century, the conception of hierarchy was applied to describe any system objects. Hierarchically organized forms exist in all spheres of objective reality: inorganic, biological, and social. In Marxist philosophy, the idea of the hierarchy of qualitatively irreducible structural levels of matter has been developed. In general organizational theory, hierarchy is seen as the principle of control that secures the effective functioning of the organization. The hierarchy of levels (tiers) of a language is distinguished in linguistics. In graph theory the hierarchically constructed graph (the so-called tree) is used.

L. A. SEDOV

hierarchy

1. Religion a body of persons in holy orders organized into graded ranks
2. Taxonomy a series of ordered groupings within a system, such as the arrangement of plants and animals into classes, orders, families, etc.
3. Linguistics Maths a formal structure, usually represented by a diagram of connected nodes, with a single uppermost element
4. government by an organized priesthood

hierarchy

An organisation with few things, or one thing, at the top and with several things below each other thing. An inverted tree structure. Examples in computing include a directory hierarchy where each directory may contain files or other directories; a hierarchical network (see hierarchical routing), a class hierarchy in object-oriented programming.

hierarchy

A structure that has a predetermined ordering from high to low. For example, all files and folders on the hard disk are organized in a hierarchy (see Win Folder organization).
References in periodicals archive ?
Jackson was basically changing the power structure of the city away from a solely business power structure," the observer continues.
Actually, it was the rebellion that brought the Germans into the area in much greater force than they had wanted to be, while the rebellion was as much against an Arab power structure as against the Germans.
Shortly after his election, he issued a written statement declaring: "My entry into the white power structure doesn't mean I have to change who I am.
Indeed their position as black enforcers of white police domination has caused them to be misread as excessively violent towards "their own people" and in many ways more unapologetically complicit with the white power structure than I see them as being.
His moderate politics would enable him to do business with Sacramento's Democratic power structure and craft bipartisan solutions to the state's problems without stepping on anyone's toes.
The contending factions within this exchange disagree on the extent to which subversion is possible within the power structure.
Further, Bodnar demonstrates that the history of public commemorations reflected America's changing power structure.
Nowhere has this process been more abused than in the San Fernando Valley, which has been carved up in loony designs to benefit the entrenched power structure.
Catholic Church, he is the author of a trilogy of books examining church organization and politics on the local, national, and international levels: Archbishop: Inside the Power Structure of the American Catholic Church (Harper & Row, 1989), A Flock of Shepherds: The National Conference of Catholic Bishops (Sheed & Ward, 1992), and Inside the Vatican: The Politics and Organization of the Catholic Church (Harvard University Press, 1997).
No politician, no matter how well-intentioned, can overcome this entrenched power structure on his own.
It is difficult to believe that all of the authors in the wide range she surveys are so entirely committed to the ideological imperatives of the existing power structure.
The new network-aware vectorless capability in RedHawk-EV enabled us to quickly identify several potential power structure issues in a current high-performance tapeout, which may have been more difficult to find with static-only analysis.