mobility

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mobility

[mō′bil·əd·ē]
(engineering)
The ability of an analytical balance to react to small load changes; affected by friction and degree of looseness in the balance components.
(fluid mechanics)
The reciprocal of the plastic viscosity of a Bingham plastic.
(physics)
Freedom of particles to move, either in random motion or under the influence of fields or forces.
(solid-state physics)

mobility

see SOCIAL MOBILITY, OCCUPATIONAL MOBILITY.

mobility

(1) An umbrella term for portable devices. See mobile device.

(2) The movement of packets in a network. See traffic engineering.
References in periodicals archive ?
These participants should complete mock powered mobility assessments involving the DSS to evaluate the system's ability to coexist with standard seating and positioning hardware.
This was further compounded by a surge in use of powered mobility devices partially due to direct-to-consumer advertising and pockets of fraudulent provision by unscrupulous suppliers and physicians.
The DSS could also be useful for teaching powered mobility and joystick manipulation skills to children with disabilities.
Thus, prescription of a powered mobility device, such as a scooter or power wheelchair, would be more appropriate than a manual wheelchair, depending on many factors such as client diagnosis, comorbid conditions, living environment, and use of transportation.
Powered mobility also allowed the children to more fully participate in school activities.
Ideally, therapists should begin approaching the subject of wheeled mobility very early with parents, as powered mobility training can begin as early as eighteen months of age.
People who are unable to walk or propel a manual wheelchair are obvious candidates for powered mobility, however, motorized chairs and scooters can enhance the quality of life for many others.
Having your child evaluated for powered mobility is never an easy undertaking.
A child's therapist or physician may express a strong opinion for or against powered mobility. Many times, two therapists will have opposing opinions.