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power,

in mathematics: see exponentexponent,
in mathematics, a number, letter, or algebraic expression written above and to the right of another number, letter, or expression called the base. In the expressions x2 and xn, the number 2 and the letter n
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.

power,

in physics, time rate of doing workwork,
in physics and mechanics, transfer of energy by a force acting to displace a body. Work is equal to the product of the force and the distance through which it produces movement.
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 or of producing or expending energyenergy,
in physics, the ability or capacity to do work or to produce change. Forms of energy include heat, light, sound, electricity, and chemical energy. Energy and work are measured in the same units—foot-pounds, joules, ergs, or some other, depending on the system of
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. The unit of power based on the English units of measurement is the horsepowerhorsepower,
unit of power in the English system of units. It is equal to 33,000 foot-pounds per minute or 550 foot-pounds per second or approximately 746 watts. The term horsepower
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, devised for describing mechanical power by James Watt, who estimated that a horse can do 550 ft-lb of work per sec; a foot-pound is the work done when a weight (force) of 1 lb is moved through a distance of 1 ft. The unit of power in the metric system is the wattwatt
[for James Watt], abbr. W, unit of power, or work done per unit time, equal to 1 joule per second. It is used as a measure of electrical and mechanical power. One watt is the amount of power that is delivered to a component of an electric circuit when a current of 1 ampere
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, named in honor of James Watt and equal to 1 joulejoule
, abbr. J, unit of work or energy in the mks system of units, which is based on the metric system; it is the work done or energy expended by a force of 1 newton acting through a distance of 1 meter. The joule is named for James P. Joule.
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 per sec; the watt is used for measuring electric power in most countries, even those still using English units for other quantities. In common usage, the terms power and energy have become synonymous; for example, electrical energy is usually referred to as electric power (see power, electricpower, electric,
energy dissipated in an electrical or electronic circuit or device per unit of time. The electrical energy supplied by a current to an appliance enables it to do work or provide some other form of energy such as light or heat.
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). See also energy, sources ofenergy, sources of,
origins of the power used for transportation, for heat and light in dwelling and working areas, and for the manufacture of goods of all kinds, among other applications.
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.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Power

The time rate of doing work. Like work, power is a scalar quantity, that is, a quantity which has magnitude but no direction. Some units often used for the measurement of power are the watt (1 joule of work per second) and the horsepower (550 foot-pounds of work per second). See Work

Power is a concept which can be used to describe the operation of any system or device in which a flow of energy occurs. In many problems of apparatus design, the power, rather than the total work to be done, determines the size of the component used. Any device can do a large amount of work by performing for a long time at a low rate of power, that is, by doing work slowly. However, if a large amount of work must be done rapidly, a high-power device is needed. High-power machines are usually larger, more complicated, and more expensive than equipment which need operate only at low power. A motor which must lift a certain weight will have to be larger and more powerful if it lifts the weight rapidly than if it raises it slowly. An electrical resistor must be large in size if it is to convert electrical energy into heat at a high rate without being damaged.

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Physics. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

power

The rate at which energy is expended by a source or work is done. It is measured in watts, i.e. in joules per second.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Power

 

a physical quantity measured as the ratio of work to the time interval during which the work is done. If the work is done at a uniform rate, power is defined by the formula N = A/t, where A is work done during the time t. In the general case N = dA/dt, where dA is the elementary work done during an elementary time interval dt (usually 1 sec). Power is measured in watts and sometimes (for engineering applications) in horse power.


Power

 

Originally, the term “power” in arithmetic and algebra meant the product of a specified number of equal factors. The product of n equal factors a is denoted by a”. Here, a is called the base, and n is called the exponent. In English, the term “power” is sometimes used in the sense of “exponent.”

The second power of a, written a2, is also known as the square of a, or a squared. The third power of a, written a3, is known as the cube of a, or a cubed. It should be noted that a2 is the area of a square with sides of length a and that a3 is the volume of a cube with edges of length a.

The fundamental operations on powers are given by the following formulas:

anm= an+m
an ÷ am= an–m
(an)m= anm

The concept of power came to be extended to cases where the exponent is not a positive integer. Thus, if the exponent is zero, we have a0 = 1 when a ≠ 0. Negative exponents are also possible: a–n = 1/an. For fractional exponents, we have Power (seeBINOMIAL EQUATION and EXTRACTION OF A ROOT). In the case of an irrational exponent α,

where rn is an arbitrary sequence of rational numbers that approaches a. The rules of operations given above also hold for powers where the exponent is not a positive integer.

The theory of analytic functions deals with powers that have imaginary bases and exponents.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

power

[′pau̇·ər]
(mathematics)
The value that is assigned to a mathematical expression and its exponent.
The power of a set is its cardinality.
For a point, with reference to a circle, the quantity (x-a)2+ (y-b)2-r 2, where x and y are the coordinates of the point, a and b are the coordinates of the center of the circle, and r is the radius of the circle.
For a point, with reference to a sphere, the quantity (x-a)2+ (y-b)2+ (z-c)2-r 2, where x, y, and z are the coordinates of the point; a, b, and c are the coordinates of the center of the sphere; and r is the radius of the sphere.
(optics)
(physics)
The time rate of doing work.
(statistics)
One minus the probability that a given test causes the acceptance of the null hypothesis when it is false due to the validity of an alternative hypothesis; this is the same as the probability of rejecting the null hypothesis by the test when the alternative is true.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

power

The rate at which work is performed, energy is transformed or transferred, or energy is consumed; usually expressed in watts or horsepower.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Power

Force, The
mystical source of a Jedi Knight’s righteous power. [Am. Cinema: Star Wars and sequels]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

power

1. control or dominion or a position of control, dominion, or authority
2. a state or other political entity with political, industrial, or military strength
3. 
a. legal authority to act, esp in a specified capacity, for another
b. the document conferring such authority
4. Maths
a. the value of a number or quantity raised to some exponent
b. another name for exponent
5. Physics Engineering a measure of the rate of doing work expressed as the work done per unit time. It is measured in watts, horsepower, etc.
6. 
a. the rate at which electrical energy is fed into or taken from a device or system. It is expressed, in a direct-current circuit, as the product of current and voltage and, in an alternating-current circuit, as the product of the effective values of the current and voltage and the cosine of the phase angle between them. It is measured in watts
b. (as modifier): a power amplifier
7. 
a. mechanical energy as opposed to manual labour
b. (as modifier): a power mower
8. 
a. a measure of the ability of a lens or optical system to magnify an object, equal to the reciprocal of the focal length. It is measured in dioptres
b. another word for magnification
9. the sixth of the nine orders into which the angels are traditionally divided in medieval angelology
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

POWER

Performance Optimization with Enhanced RISC. The IBM processor architecture on which PowerPC was based.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

power

(1) Electricity. See current, volt, watt, AC and DC.

(2) The capability of a computer system. See computer power and throughput.

(3) (POWER) (Performance Optimization With Enhanced RISC) A family of RISC-based CPUs from IBM. See POWER CPU and Power Systems.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
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After reading the articles and applying the inclusion criteria, 35 studies grounded the analysis of the Concept powerlessness in individuals with stroke, being 23 of Pubmed / Medline and 12 of CINAHL.
The post-independence African response amounts to an outright sycophantic submission to IME, World Bank, and WTO prescriptions that has occasioned to a deepening relegation to powerlessness and prostration of the continent.
Table 3.3: Frequency table of the respondents in terms of political powerlessness items.
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European Council President Herman Van Rompuy, who had come to appear before the presidents of the European Parliament's political groups on 16 March to present the conclusions of the extraordinary Council on Libya and the strategy in the Mediterranean region (11 March), was hit with considerable criticism about the EU's powerlessness vis a vis the crisis in Libya.
Separatist forces could organize the tragic events in June in Osh and Jalal-Abad oblasts due to helplessness of the authorities, said Ata Jurt faction leader Ahmatbek Keldibekov today in Parliament.Due to powerlessness of the state the events in June led to clashes of two peoples, who used to live in peace for centuries."The future of Kyrgyzstan is in hands of parliamentarians.
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Summary: The death of Akmal Shaikh highlights Britain's "powerlessness in the world", according to his relatives.
"To admit that Egypt can't even open its sovereign border without permission from Washington tells you all you need to know about the powerlessness of the satraps that run the Middle East for us," he wrote.