prairie dog


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prairie dog,

short-tailed, ground-living rodent, genus Cynomys, of the squirrelsquirrel,
name for small or medium-sized rodents of the family Sciuridae, found throughout the world except in Australia, Madagascar, and the polar regions; it is applied especially to the tree-living species.
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 family, closely related to the ground squirrels, chipmunks, and marmots. There are several species, found in the W United States and N Mexico. Prairie dogs, named for their barking cries, are 12 to 15 in. (30 to 36 cm) long, including the 1- to 4-in. (2.5 to 10 cm) tail, and have short, coarse, buff-colored fur. The black-tailed prairie dog, Cynomys ludovicianus, is found on the Great Plains. Members of this species live in connecting burrows, forming colonies, or "towns," which may extend many miles and include thousands of individuals. The entrances of the burrows are surrounded by cone-shaped mounds, which serve to keep out rainwater; the entrance shafts drop straight down for several feet. Prairie dogs spend much time maintaining the mounds by tamping down damp earth. They often sit upright on their haunches in rows, one animal on each mound; this behavior has given them the name "picket pins" in some regions. At any sign of danger the animals give a warning cry and duck down into the burrows. Rattlesnakes and burrowing owls sometimes live in the burrows and prey on young prairie dogs. Three species of white-tailed prairie dogs inhabit open or brushy valleys of the Rocky Mts; their burrows are usually less extensive than those of the black-tailed species. Prairie dogs feed mainly on grasses, but also eat insects; they hibernate in winter. Prairie dog towns were formerly much more common and extensive than now; some towns on the plains encompassed millions of individuals. Ranchers regard the animals as competitors for grazing lands and have destroyed them in large numbers. Prairie dogs are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Rodentia, family Sciuridae.

prairie dog

[′prer·ē ‚dȯg]
(vertebrate zoology)
The common name for three species of stout, fossorial rodents belonging to the genus Cynomys in the family Sciuridae; all have a short, flat tail, small ears, and short limbs terminating in long claws.

prairie dog

any of several gregarious sciurine rodents of the genus Cynomys, such as C. ludovicianus, that live in large complex burrows in the prairies of North America
References in periodicals archive ?
TABLE 1--Rodents tested for hantavirus antibodies in grassland with prairie dog colonies (GLPD), grassland without prairie dog colonies (GL), and mesquite scrublands (MS) in the Janos-Nuevo Casas Grandes prairie dog complex, in Chihuahua, Mexico.
When you're using one, prairie dogs will stay up out of the ground longer, and if you miss a shot on a coyote--or if multiple coyotes come in--you can get more rounds off before you scare the rest of them.
For Gunnison's and white-tailed prairie dogs, however, polyandrous females were less likely than monandrous females to survive until the next mating season.
Some studies have compared the sizes of prairie dog colonies occupied by Burrowing Owls to colonies that were not occupied by owls, but results were mixed.
Prairie dogs have their own language, and humans have the ability to master it.
This bird relies on prairie dogs to nibble grass, creating clearings so plovers can build their nests on the ground.
Species assessment for black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludoviciantes) in Wyoming.
Convinced that he is a prairie dog too--that would explain why he's different--the little dachshund teams up with Cody, and they embark on a quest to save the town from dangerous invaders and a devastating storm.
Whether the senator was aware or not, the fate of the prairie dog has in many ways been determined by the expansion of industrial animal agriculture, especially cattle.
In a burrows network the prairie dogs use their colony to protect their young.
The book's center is a journal she kept while helping on a prairie dog stay in Bryce Canyon National Park in central Utah.