prairie soil


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prairie soil:

see podzolpodzol
or podzolic soil,
member of a group of soils that are gray in color, have an ashy appearance, and extend immediately south of the tundra regions of the Northern Hemisphere.
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prairie soil

[′prer·ē ‚sȯil]
(geology)
A group of zonal soils having a surface horizon that is dark or grayish brown, which grades through brown soil into lighter-colored parent material; it is 2-5 feet (0.6-1.5 meters) thick and develops under tall grass in a temperate and humid climate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prairie soils in temperate climates of North America contain an abundance of C[O.sub.2]-producing microbes that utilize carbon deposits from soil-dwelling invertebrates such as earthworms and micro- and macro-arthropods, including subterranean termites (Panzer, 2002; Hendrix el al, 2006).
One difference is the high organic matter content of prairie soils.
Total C in CRP soils was 24% to 30% lower than total C observed in the native prairie soil and was not significantly different between fields with zero or ten growing seasons in the CRP (Table 2).
Invading trees are associated with lower organic matter in northern prairie soils (Dormaar and Lutwick 1966, Bettany et al.
The significant interaction between soil origin and root exclosures [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 4B OMITTED] occurred because there was considerable net mineralization in forest soils but little or none in prairie soils, reflecting a greater flux of N in forest soils.
The prairie soil cools steadily during the winter, reaching ca.
Every year a prairie soil supports a diverse mix of legumes, grasses, algae, and an associated complex food web of consumers.
Chemical transformation of urea-nitrogen and movement of nitrogen in shortgrass prairie soil. Soil Science Society of America Journal 45:893-898.
Lisa Durso, a microbiologist at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Agroecosystem Management Research Unit in Lincoln, Nebraska, recently found antibiotic-resistant bacteria in prairie soils that had little or no exposure to human or animal activity.
The upland loess-capped prairie soils are easily distinguished from the forest soils by the black color imparted by the decay of prairie roots and above ground growth (mollic epipedon).
(This is how the deep, fertile prairie soils have been formed around the world.) No outside fertilizers are needed--our farm is truly solar-powered and beyond sustainable!
The bacteria added to the compost are the same families of bacteria found in rich prairie soils. The bacteria have the ability to use existing nutrients in the ground and air and make them available to plants.