prayer book

(redirected from prayerbook)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

prayer book

1. Ecclesiast a book containing the prayers used at church services or recommended for private devotions
2. Church of England another name for Book of Common Prayer
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
First instituted in 1549, the prayerbooks primary goal was to provide a uniform liturgy across the English Church.
But Gibbonss emphasis on the continuity of Catholic thought in the writing and dissemination of the Prayerbook sets his study apart from the body of recent scholarship on English state worship.
But the prayerbook of our Bible, Psalms, is full of complaining, accusing, utterances of revenge, protest, and questions.
When priest and teacher were absent, we would go into the churchyard, keeping the prayerbook open; as the pages were somewhat greasy, the flies and the bumblebees would come to them in swarms, and when we suddenly clapped the books shut, we often killed twenty of them at one blow.
Prayerbook Reform in Europe: The Liturgy of European Liberal and Reform Judaism.
Furthermore, despite the fact that puritan and prayerbook Protestants alike habitually interpreted external signs as evidence of God's favor or judgment, these signals too were uncertain and reversible, since both worldly prosperity and affliction could signal either reprobation or election.
Inserts to touch that evoke sticky honey, bumpy lemon (etrov), the smooth prayerbook, a shiny mirror on a sukkot booth, and a bit of soft velvet like the Torah cover are all included.
A chapter (5) on the King James Bible broaches a problem concerning the manuscript book of hours converted into a printed prayerbook, downplaying the art found in the former.
Rosary, prayerbook Sharing the wine at the liturgy Fiesta, cake, hot chocolate, pinata Friends and relatives Even Jesus celebrated with me.
The 'Bibles incident' involved one Bible and one prayerbook supplied by a non-Catholic clergyman.
In celebration of the High Holiday, Jews gather in synagoguesfor extended services that follow the liturgy of a special prayerbook, called a "mahzor