precancerous


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Related to precancerous: precancerous polyps, Precancerous cells

precancerous

(esp of cells) displaying characteristics that may develop into cancer
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

precancerous

[prē′kan·sə·rəs]
(pathology)
Pertaining to any pathological condition of a tissue which is likely to develop into cancer.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
There have been a lot of studies dedicated to cancer-related topics, exactly how this precancerous field influences cancer has been often overlooked.
CRC typically begins as precancerous polyps or abnormal growths in the colon or rectum, which can be present for up to 10 years before developing into invasive cancer.
Mucosal atrophy and intestinal metaplasia have been considered precancerous lesions (4).
As many as 1,300 oral cancer cases and 3,600 precancerous lesion cases are confirmed every year.
That can lead to the development of precancerous lesions and, potentially, cancer."
Esophageal cancer is the most rapidly growing cancer in the US and is generally fatal; early detection of precancerous cells leads to improved patient outcomes all while lowering overall healthcare costs.
It uses radiation to generate computerized 2- and 3-dimensional images of the entire colorectum, which are scanned for potential cancerous and precancerous lesions without using an endoscope.
This volume addresses the prevention, diagnosis, and management of precancerous lesions of the cervix.
Their study said how factors that regulate the growth of adult stern cells that repair tissue in the lungs can lead to the formation of precancerous lesions.
The secondary outcome was the DNA test's ability to detect advanced precancerous lesions, including advanced adenomas and sessile serrated polyps measuring 1 cm or more in diameter, compared with the performance of a commercially available fecal immunochemical test (FIT) for human hemoglobin.