precision

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precision

[prə′sizh·ən]
(mathematics)
The number of digits in a decimal fraction to the right of the decimal point.
(navigation)
In air operations, pertaining to a navigational facility which provides a combined azimuth and glide slope guidance to a runway.
(science and technology)
The measure of the range of values of a set of measurements; indicates reproducibility of the observations.

Precision

 

a measure of the dispersion of the values of a random variable. The precision h is related to the standard deviation σ by the formula

This method of measuring dispersion is justified since, in the case of a normal distribution, the probability density of a random variable with precision h and mathematical expectation a is described by the formula

The precision is used as a measure of the dispersion primarily in gunnery theory and the theory of errors.

precision

(mathematics)
The number of decimal places to which a number is computed.

Compare accuracy.

precision

The number of digits used to express the fractional part of a number. The more digits, the more precision. See single precision and double precision. See also accuracy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Precisionism marked a new era in the development of American art because it celebrated American industry, the modern city and the advancement of technology.
In Picabia's machinist drawings we find the origin of American precisionism, and in the notorious Fountain, famously photographed by Stieglitz, we trace the beginning of the Duchamp-Dada tradition in this country that to this day, for better or worse, continues to shape much of our art.
Indeed, might Hopper here emerge as the crypto-modernist he was, his "realism" cloaking a canny grasp of Romanticism, Precisionism, and even Surrealism?
As the name suggests, Precisionism was not only a choice of subject matter, it was an artistic style that was executed very carefully and exactly.
The ideal would have been also to devote a section to "Hyperrealism" before Hyperrealism: Peto's trompe l'oeil, Precisionism, etc.
His color images of industrial sites, warehouses, rooms adapted for special production, and enlarged details of machinery have their clear progenitors: from the American Precisionism of Charles Sheeler to the Central European photography of the '30s.