predicate calculus


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predicate calculus

[′pred·ə·kət ‚kal·kyə·ləs]
(mathematics)
The mathematical study of logical statements relating to arbitrary sets of objects and involving predicates and quantifiers as well as propositional connectives.

Predicate Calculus

 

(also functional calculus), a branch of mathematical logic—an aggregate of logical and mathematical calculi that formalize those branches of modern logic in which the rules of operating with quantifiers are elucidated and studied (in connection with the examination of the subject-predicate structure of propositions).

predicate calculus

References in periodicals archive ?
The advantage to this approach is that it makes Lacan's travesty of the syntactical rules of the predicate calculus even more apparent than his original notation.
It is not a simple matter to combine a large number of fragments, often with two or more free variables, into a single correct nth-order predicate calculus query.
This is the body of the expression of the predicate calculus.
This information may be represented, in principle, in any number of ways, among which predicate calculus notation is one.
The numerous proposed generalizations of Horn clauses will bring LP increasingly close to the original goal of programming in the full predicate calculus.
Frege's predicate calculus was regarded by its founder as offering a better representation of thought than that available in natural language, which on account of its ambiguity and reliance on context is an inappropriate medium for the representation of mathematical proof.
The completeness of the predicate calculus links the syntactic property of formal provability with the conceptually quite different semantic property of logical truth.
Monadic calculus is certainly a constrained system compared to the full predicate calculus.
In representing a proposition undergoing irtifa, the predicate calculus is used.
To summarize it in a sentence, it is a frame-based language embedded in a more expressive predicate calculus framework along with features for representing defaults, for reification (allowing one to talk about propositions in the KB) and for reflection (allowing one to talk about the act of working on some problem.
But our standard formal languages, for example, the predicate calculus, feature only singular terms.
Some would argue that the limitation to predicate calculus should be relaxed to encompass other more general forms of logic, for example, modal logics.