preeclampsia

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Related to preeclamptic: preeclampsia, eclampsia

preeclampsia

[¦prē·i′klamp·sē·ə]
(medicine)
A toxemia occurring in the latter half of pregnancy, characterized by an acute elevation of blood pressure and usually by edema and proteinuria, but without convulsions or coma. Also known as toxemia of pregnancy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Khosrowbeygi and Ahmadvand observed that serum levels of adiponectin were significantly higher in the preeclamptic patients compared to controls and serum adiponectin had a significant negative correlation with body mass index in PE patients but not in normal pregnant women [36].
Plasma ficolin-2 levels are low in preeclamptic patients if compared with healthy pregnant women.
As demonstrated in table 2, the frequency of minor allele of eNOS a was higher in both mild (16.5%) and severe (17.2%) preeclamptic women than controls (15.1%).
Data Source: A prospective cohort study of 267 normotensive, gestational hypertensive, and preeclamptic pregnancies.
Maternal and neonatal outcome of preeclamptic pregnancies: the potential roles of factor V Leiden mutation and 5,10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase.
The new study "strengthens beyond reasonable doubt" the evidence that magnesium sulfate reduces the risk of eclampsia among preeclamptic women, conclude Shirish S.
[7,8] In our study, the levels of serum LDH was statistically significantly higher (p< 0.0001) in preeclamptic women as compared to normal pregnant women as shown in Table 2 and Table 3.
miRNA-376c, -377, and -411 levels were determined in normal and preeclamptic pregnancies by qRT-PCR.
All of the above is present in the preeclamptic state that could eventually lead to the full-blown eclampsia.
It was demonstrated that preeclamptic patients with increased serum uric acid values had to undergo induced labor due to their increased risk of complications.13 Similarly, our results showed a higher mean level of maternal serum uric acid in women with severe preeclampsia in comparison to those with mild type (P 0.70 and were modestly predictive tests to show adverse maternal outcomes in women with preeclampsia.
A limited number of studies have shown the expression pattern of some ADAMTS subtypes in human placenta and their possible implication in gestational trophoblastic diseases (15, 16); however, a more comprehensive study is required to show the expression pattern of all ADAMTS family members in preeclamptic placentas.