preface


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preface

1. a statement written as an introduction to a literary or other work, typically explaining its scope, intention, method, etc.; foreword
2. RC Church a prayer of thanksgiving and exhortation serving as an introduction to the canon of the Mass
References in classic literature ?
I think we'd better hold them back a bit and I'll write a preface.
As will be seen later on, Pygmalion needs, not a preface, but a sequel, which I have supplied in its due place.
In the Preface to the later edition of Sordello, Mr.
I gave her the handbill without another word of preface.
With this audacious preface, he proceeds to state the conditions on which he will play his part in the conspiracy, and die (if he does die) worth a thousand pounds.
In the preface to "Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz" I said I would like to write some stories that were not "Oz" stories, because I thought I had written about Oz long enough; but since that volume was published I have been fairly deluged with letters from children imploring me to "write more about Dorothy," and "more about Oz," and since I write only to please the children I shall try to respect their wishes.
AS a preface is the only place where an author can with propriety explain a purpose or apologize for shortcomings, I venture to avail myself of the privilege to make a statement for the benefit of my readers.
IN offering this book to you, I have no Preface to write.
In the preface Caxton tells us how, after he had printed some other books, many gentlemen came to him to ask him why he did not print a history of King Arthur, "which ought most to be remembered among us Englishmen afore all the Christian kings; to whom I answered that diverse men hold opinion that there was no such Arthur, and all such books as be made of him be but fained matters and fables.
In reference to these gentry, I may here quote a few words from the original preface to this book.
I have stated in the preface to the first Edition of this work, and in the Zoology of the Voyage of the Beagle, that it was in consequence of a wish expressed by Captain Fitz Roy, of having some scientific person on board, accompanied by an offer from him of giving up part of his own accommodations, that I volunteered my services, which received, through the kindness of the hydrographer, Captain Beaufort, the sanction of the Lords of the Admiralty.
Without further preface then, I here present you with the labours of some years of my life.