preface

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preface

1. a statement written as an introduction to a literary or other work, typically explaining its scope, intention, method, etc.; foreword
2. RC Church a prayer of thanksgiving and exhortation serving as an introduction to the canon of the Mass
References in classic literature ?
This printer also says in his preface that the book was first written in the time of King Edward III, "In whose time it pleased God to open the eyes of many to see his truth, giving them boldness of heart to open their mouths and cry out against the works of darkness.
Crowley is his preface to Piers Ploughman, printed in 1550.
Indeed I have run into a preface, while I professed to write a dedication.
Browning might say, as his wife said in an early preface, I never mistook pleasure for the final cause of poetry, nor leisure for the hour of the poet--as indeed he has himself said, to much the same effect, in a letter printed many years ago: I never pretended to offer such literature as should be a substitute for a cigar or a game at dominoes to an idle man.
One other quotation from the same Preface may serve to introduce a fact that my readers may think curious.
It is remarkable, also, as containing in its preface the germ of an idea, which has been since proved to have been correct by a strange chain of circumstances.
Nevelet, in the preface to the volume which we have described, points out that the Fables of Planudes could not be the work of Aesop, as they contain a reference in two places to "Holy monks," and give a verse from the Epistle of St.
I think we'd better hold them back a bit and I'll write a preface.
I think I'll do an article for one of the reviews, and then I can just print it afterwards as a preface.
he ever wrote, but in his earliest prefaces (both published and
For this purpose, translators' prefaces from translations published in Malaysia were collected and examined.
This essay posits translators' prefaces as democratic spaces of individuality.