preglacial


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preglacial

[prē′glā·shəl]
(geology)
Pertaining to the geologic time immediately preceding the Pleistocene epoch.
Of material, underlying glacial deposits.
References in periodicals archive ?
Above the lowermost marine clay is a "mixed" preglacial sediment package composed of clay, sand, silt, and gravel representing marine, nearshore marine, shoreline brackish, and terrestrial environments.
In the report on eastern New Brunswick, northwest Nova Scotia, and part of Prince Edward Island, Chalmers (G-1892a, b, 1893, 1894, 1895a, b) again devoted space to preglacial denudation, the topic arising from the physiography of the Cobequid Mountains, where evidence pointed to the same conclusions as reached for the Caledonia Hills in the previous report.
5 m) boulder clay horizon, despite the intensity of fracturing and folding [17], indicating a preglacial origin for deformation.
Preferential incorporation occurred at points of increased erosion and in areas of thick preglacial sediment accumulations, altering matrix composition and obscuring some geochemical dispersal patterns.
Andreas (1985) proposed that Ohio peatland distribution is related to preglacial (buried) river valleys.
El bosque de Aextoxicon punctatum se encuentra tambien en calidad de relicto en agrupaciones localizadas en la zona costera septentrional del pais, lo cual se ha explicado como fragmentos remanentes de una comunidad forestal preglacial, asociada a las condiciones climaticas uniformes de la cordillera costera (Villagran et al.
It is accompanied by the less abundant Siberian spruce (Picea obovata), which is considered a preglacial relict species.
Similarity of southern Ozark and northern Ouachita fishes supported Mayden's (1985) view of a continuous preglacial highland.
Previous authors have considered Gammarus fossarum to be a preglacial inhabitant of the Alps (review in Scheepmaker 1990), largely represented in this area (Dusaugey 1955, Siegismund and Muller 1991), and rather independent from the Ca content of the water (Roux 1971).
A more innovative approach at a site where the transmissive soil layers diminish away from the preglacial valley or where the saturated thickness is quite shallow is to construct multiple withdrawal points consisting of two or more pumping wells and one well in which the water level is monitored.
Below the balustrade with the flat thorny bodies of plants, behind the cars passing by down on the highway, radio commercials and pop tunes blaring out from the lowered windows, he must have a view of the beach with the pebbly sand, the tan people, faces behind sunglasses, inflated playthings, naked children at the waterline, their cries and voices behind the passing music like invisible waves, a foaming, now distant, now closer, like the offshore waves drawing darker diagonal lines across the scattered glittering of the water surface in the intensifying afternoon sun, still possible to see the sandy bottom from up here, with its varying shadows of seaweed suggesting uninhabited continents in an untamed, preglacial world.