preglacial


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preglacial

[prē′glā·shəl]
(geology)
Pertaining to the geologic time immediately preceding the Pleistocene epoch.
Of material, underlying glacial deposits.
References in periodicals archive ?
Andreas (1985) proposed that Ohio peatland distribution is related to preglacial (buried) river valleys.
Below the balustrade with the flat thorny bodies of plants, behind the cars passing by down on the highway, radio commercials and pop tunes blaring out from the lowered windows, he must have a view of the beach with the pebbly sand, the tan people, faces behind sunglasses, inflated playthings, naked children at the waterline, their cries and voices behind the passing music like invisible waves, a foaming, now distant, now closer, like the offshore waves drawing darker diagonal lines across the scattered glittering of the water surface in the intensifying afternoon sun, still possible to see the sandy bottom from up here, with its varying shadows of seaweed suggesting uninhabited continents in an untamed, preglacial world.
The Great Lakes mark the location of weak rocks, such as limestone and shale, that were easily eroded in preglacial ages to form river valleys that drained into this region.
55-71, in early Pleistocene preglacial and glacial rocks and faunas of north-central Nebraska (M.
Goretski 1972), (2) as a consequence of meltwater erosion (Rattas 2007), and (3) mainly as a result of erosion of preglacial rivers, which were later deepened and enlarged by glaciers and subglacial meltwaters.
In 1926, Sears published a map of the natural treeless areas of Ohio showing their correlations with physiography, moraines, preglacial drainage routes and postglacial lakes.
Interglacial and preglacial sediments form the banks along the centre of the strait.
The historical distribution of this or a similar taxon was probably much broader in prearid phase times in extensive preglacial forests, but did not include the Amazonian basin because it does not presently occur there.
In the same publication were maps that depicted the relationship of oak and beech forest to the moraines; and, the natural treeless areas of Ohio and their correlation with moraines, preglacial drainage routes and postglacial lakes.
His geological studies concentrated on the region around his birthplace at the head of Lake Ontario: at first they were mainly of Paleozoic geology and paleontology, but by 1880 they had switched decisively to surficial geology, particularly the preglacial drainage of Lakes Erie and Ontario.