prelacy


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Related to prelacy: Armenian Apostolic Church

prelacy

1. 
a. the office or status of a prelate
b. prelates collectively
2. Often derogatory government of the Church by prelates
References in periodicals archive ?
How does the parable operate as part of the rhetoric of reform during the prelacy controversy?
Armenian Prelacy Bishop Shahan Sarkissian, the accompanying delegation of Catholicos Aram I and MP Sinbul Sinbulian attended the meeting.
Duck blurred what were for Gauden separate ecclesiastical realities, bringing a member of the medieval prelacy into the orbit of reformed episcopacy.
Aquinas, unlike Bonaventure, shifts the discussion away from poverty and toward charity, as the central virtue for all religious and prelacy.
With a murderous monk-like albino, working for a Christian prelacy called Opus Dei, and the Direction Centrale Police Judiciaire (the French judicial police) chasing him, Langdon finds himself desperately seeking to unravel the clues Sauniere left behind to prove that he and Neveu are innocent.
How do episcopal conferences and universal synods exercise authentic magisterial authority, thereby keeping the primacy and prelacy in proper collegial balance?
LA CRESCENTA - Archbishop Moushegh Mardirossian looks forward to the day next spring when the La Crescenta church headquarters for the Western Prelacy of the Armenian Apostolic Church of America opens to welcome the community.
Because they fear to lose their position or their temporal goods, or their prelacy, they do not correct those under them, but act like blind ones, in that they see not the real way by which their position is to be kept.
who own, acknowledge, and subject themselves to the Ecclesiastical headship of the Roman Hierarchy, Pope, and Papal Prelacy, Episcopacy, or Presbytery.
Attacking a prelacy ignorant of Hebrew, for example, Milton, in another tract, describes the prelates' lips as "uncircumcised" In his splendid analysis of the phrase, Shoulson argues that Milton here implies that "the English people are partly accountable for the success of these prelates with uncircumcised lips.
The puritans examined by Gribben are defined more traditionally as those who sought reform within the established church; all of them, however, from James Ussher to George Gillespie to John Milton, departed in some way or another from accepted puritan tenets, such as opposition to prelacy or an affiliation with Calvinism.
Like Martin Mar-Prelate, the well-known sobriquet of an anti-episcopal dissident in Shakespeare's day, Shakespeare was a pseudonym that addressed the chief realm of the writer's attention: in Mar-Prelate's case, his focal point was the prelacy of the Anglican Church; in Shakespeare's case, it was the theater.