prelude

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prelude

(prā`lo͞od), musical composition of no universal style, usually for the keyboard. It was originally used to precede a ceremony and later a second, often larger piece. Early preludes represent the first example of idiomatic keyboard music. During the baroque period the prelude formed the first movement of suites and fugues. The most widely known preludes, those written for the piano by Frédéric Chopin, Claude Debussy and Aleksandr Scriabin, are independent works with no introductory function.

Prelude

 

an instrumental musical piece, usually a solo. Originally a prelude was a short introduction to any piece and was played by a lute, a stringed-keyboard instrument, or an organ. Especially in its early form, it is characterized by an improvisational style, free development, figurate treatment of the material, and the application from beginning to end of a single manner of execution, which makes it close to the genre of the étude. Preludes have often been designated by other names, including a praeambula, intrada, recercari, and fantasia.

In the 18th century composers wrote preludes as independent pieces, chiefly for stringed-keyboard instruments. At the same time, above all in the work of J. S. Bach, the prelude was combined with the fugue, becoming a standard short cyclic form. Bach also established the large cyclic form that combines preludes and fugues and embraces all the major and minor keys, for example, the first and second volumes of the Well-Tempered Clavier. Similar forms were created later, for example, Shostakovich’s 24 Preludes and Fugues for piano. In addition, a cyclic form consisting only of preludes, also in all keys, was developed by such composers as F. Chopin, A. N. Scriabin, C. Debussy, and D. B. Kabalevskii.

prelude

a. a piece of music that precedes a fugue, or forms the first movement of a suite, or an introduction to an act in an opera, etc.
b. (esp for piano) a self-contained piece of music
References in periodicals archive ?
2:20 p.m.: Pianist Jonathan Besancon, performing "Toccata in G major: Allegro, Adagio, Allegro e presto," "Prelude and Fugue in G minor WTC 1," "Concerto No.
Of the more abstract preludes, "Libra," a brief piece employing ad libitum time brackets, quickly became a favorite.
In chapter 1, "The Traditions, the Innovations, and the Predicaments," Leikin examines three clues: the various preludes in opus 28 contain widely varying numbers of measures; Chopin performed them in groups; and Franz Liszt described them as '"poetic preludes similar to those of a great contemporary poet' clearly alluding to Alphonse de Lamartine's poem entitled Les Preludes" (p.
The more relaxed pieces, like the A flat's allegretto were little oases of amiability and Donohoe built an imposing Mussorgsky-like peroration to the D Minor Prelude and Fugue that provided a majestic climax.
Longtime State of the Arts supporter Sam Brock showed off his musical talent by playing Johann Sebastian Bach's Prelude #22 Well-Tempered Clavichord and Chopin's Prelude Op.
The disc concludes with three of Debussy's piano Preludes orchestrated by Colin Matthews, which are also quite appealing.
HONDA'S Prelude was for many years the coupe version of the Accord saloon.
It may be a stretch when we already know the story's end, but we can sympathize with three sleepless nights and fearful days spent wondering, "Is he still alive?" Ultimately, all parents must lose their children, the wrenching of Mary's heart a prelude to our separations.
To be fair to the other directors, the Preludes were not set up in a way that would inspire anyone to think big.
Auds will have plenty of opportunity to see the Preludes individually or all together.
Honda expects to sell 2500 Preludes in the UK this year.