prelude

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prelude

(prā`lo͞od), musical composition of no universal style, usually for the keyboard. It was originally used to precede a ceremony and later a second, often larger piece. Early preludes represent the first example of idiomatic keyboard music. During the baroque period the prelude formed the first movement of suites and fugues. The most widely known preludes, those written for the piano by Frédéric Chopin, Claude Debussy and Aleksandr Scriabin, are independent works with no introductory function.

Prelude

 

an instrumental musical piece, usually a solo. Originally a prelude was a short introduction to any piece and was played by a lute, a stringed-keyboard instrument, or an organ. Especially in its early form, it is characterized by an improvisational style, free development, figurate treatment of the material, and the application from beginning to end of a single manner of execution, which makes it close to the genre of the étude. Preludes have often been designated by other names, including a praeambula, intrada, recercari, and fantasia.

In the 18th century composers wrote preludes as independent pieces, chiefly for stringed-keyboard instruments. At the same time, above all in the work of J. S. Bach, the prelude was combined with the fugue, becoming a standard short cyclic form. Bach also established the large cyclic form that combines preludes and fugues and embraces all the major and minor keys, for example, the first and second volumes of the Well-Tempered Clavier. Similar forms were created later, for example, Shostakovich’s 24 Preludes and Fugues for piano. In addition, a cyclic form consisting only of preludes, also in all keys, was developed by such composers as F. Chopin, A. N. Scriabin, C. Debussy, and D. B. Kabalevskii.

prelude

a. a piece of music that precedes a fugue, or forms the first movement of a suite, or an introduction to an act in an opera, etc.
b. (esp for piano) a self-contained piece of music
References in periodicals archive ?
The preludes, while following the established trend of writing one prelude in each of the major and minor keys, also employ 20th-century compositional techniques such as planing, quartal and quintal harmonies, unmetered pieces, feathered beam accelerando and time brackets.
Last month Prelude arrived at its operating location in the Browse Basin, offshore northwest Australia.
In chapter 1, "The Traditions, the Innovations, and the Predicaments," Leikin examines three clues: the various preludes in opus 28 contain widely varying numbers of measures; Chopin performed them in groups; and Franz Liszt described them as '"poetic preludes similar to those of a great contemporary poet' clearly alluding to Alphonse de Lamartine's poem entitled Les Preludes" (p.
The disc concludes with three of Debussy's piano Preludes orchestrated by Colin Matthews, which are also quite appealing.
HONDA'S Prelude was for many years the coupe version of the Accord saloon.
To be fair to the other directors, the Preludes were not set up in a way that would inspire anyone to think big.
The weekend celebrations also serve as a prelude to Latino Heritage Month, which will be observed with a variety of events from mid-September to Oct.
Japanese giant Honda risked a backlash by softening the lines of the Prelude.
The first book of Preludes is offset on this disc by the Images of 1894, referred to by Debussy as 'conversations' between piano and pianist, not to be played in 'brilliantly illuminated drawing-rooms'.
Richard Lane's collection of piano preludes invites students, teachers and audience members into the personal world of the composer with complex and expressive writing that was inspired by performer personas and pedagogical experiences.
This contract, effective immediately, follows Wood Group Kennys successful design of Preludes subsea flowlines.