prepattern

prepattern

[′prē‚pad·ərn]
(embryology)
The organization in a developing organism before a definite organizational pattern is established.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the end, a baking process leads to the new microstructures which are derived from prepattern. The baking process allows a successful shrinkage into a smaller scale.
Prepattern genes and signaling molecules regulate stripe expression to specify Drosophila flight muscle attachment sites.
To improve the control of the formation of AAO arrays, various top-down methods have been proposed in the literature to prepattern the aluminum surface prior to the electrochemical treatment.
Citation: "Chromatin "Prepattern" and Histone Modifiers in a Fate Choice for Liver and Pancreas;" Cheng-Ran Xu, et al.; Science, 20 May 2011, Vol.
Fish may similarly arrange their colored scales according to a "prepattern" but probably decorate their fins according to mathematical principles laid out on a blank slate.
In the preotic region, neural crest cells make the prepattern of trigeminal and facial nerves according to the segmental character of the rhombencephalon (hindbrain), whereas the postotic crest cells have no rhombencephalic restriction but are limited in their migration by the anterior boundary of the trunk region, and thus make the prepattern of glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves (Shigetani et al., 1995; Ferguson and Graham, 2004).
Specifically, a diffraction element was used to prepattern the coherent output of a laser prior to its capture in a photoresist.
Previous studies have suggested that the CNS is responsible for laying down a matrix that forms the prepattern of the cartilage of the cranial base (e.g., Thorogood 1988; Wood et al.
[i]n this way the observed coat colour pattern reflects an underlying chemical prepattern, to which melanocytes are reacting to produce melanin (Murray, 1993:437, 438)." This assumption of a single mechanism contradicts abundant evidence presented and reviewed by Searle (1968:55) that "the colour [and pattern] of the mammalian coat depends on a large number of variable factors, themselves interdependent." For example, Searle (1968) cites a study by Mayer and Maltby (1964) which demonstrated that the white area in the belted mouse (Mus spp.) is caused not by delayed migration of melanoblasts, but rather by some factor preventing melanoblasts from entering the developing follicle or preventing their maturation in the follicular environment.
Questions that have been asked are: Do monosymmetry genes respond to a common dorsoventral prepattern in the apex (Clark & Coen, 2002)?