presbyter

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Related to presbyterate: diaconate

presbyter

1. 
a. an elder of a congregation in the early Christian Church
b. (in some Churches having episcopal politics) an official who is subordinate to a bishop and has administrative, teaching, and sacerdotal functions
2. (in some hierarchical Churches) another name for priest
3. in the Presbyterian Church
a. a teaching elder
b. a ruling elder
References in periodicals archive ?
In "Learning the Ways of Receptive Ecumenism," Gros added the importance of pedagogical and catechetical considerations to his previous appeals concerning the necessity of cultivating ecumenical (and, by implication, relational) receptivity in presbyterate formation.
Development of an episcopate and presbyterate, however, did not undermine "the baptismal and charismatic identity of all the members of the eucharistic assembly, laity as well as clergy.
Commission member Cipriano Vagaggini found that women deacons were ordained by the bishop in the presence of the presbyterate and within the sanctuary by the imposition of hands; Vagaggini published his positive historical analysis of women deacons in an Italian journal two years later.
Two factors tend to confirm that this was the original function of the presbyterate, and that it emerged later than the |officers' we have already discussed.
The diaconate and priesthood--already clearly separated in teaching--were further distinguished in 2009, when Pope Benedict XVI modified canon law to read: "Those who are constituted in the order of the episcopate or the presbyterate receive the mission and capacity to act in the person of Christ the Head, whereas deacons are empowered to serve the People of God in the ministries of the liturgy, the word and charity.
3) Among the achievements of Vatican II would be the retrieval of the ancient notion that the church is preeminently manifested "when the holy people of God, all of them, are actively and fully sharing in the same liturgical celebrations--especially when it is the same eucharist--sharing one prayer at one altar, at which the bishop is presiding, surrounded by his presbyterate and his ministers.
While many of your points concerning a married presbyterate may raise valid questions, Cones should be clear to readers.
2) The Byzantine Church, following historical Christian tradition, (3) excluded women from the ordained orders of the presbyterate (priesthood) and the episcopate based on an anthropology of separate and unequal roles for the sexes, (4) and grounded biblically in the Pauline prohibition against women speaking in church (l Corinthians 14: 34), and particularly on the deutero-Pauline injunction against women teaching (1 Timothy 2:11-12), the latter argued as a result of woman's role in the Fall from grace in the Garden of Eden.
In the case of the revolt against the presbyterate, Lindemann fails to account satisfactorily for the reference in 44: 6, that the Corinthians have |removed some from the ministry', a phrase best interpreted as indicating a revolt against a few (not all) Corinthian presbyters.
The authors are noteworthy Catholic theologians who approach ministry from their specific theological subspecialties and discuss topical issues such as: the role of the presbyterate within the parish, understanding the place of ministry within canon law, the importance of the "royal priesthood" within the larger life of the Church, and ministry within religious orders.
The papers discussed were Michael Slusser's "Two Sacred Orders: Diaconate and Presbyterate," George Tavard's "The Tridentine Anathemas concerning Ministry and Ordination," Susan Wood's "The Teaching of Vatican II on Bishops and Priests," Scott Ickert's "Adiaphora, Ius Divinum, and Ministry: A Lutheran Perspective," Margaret O'Gara's "A Roman Catholic Perspective on Ius Divinum," and Patrick Granfield's "The Universality and Particularity of the Roman Catholic Church.
resent that he has bypassed the San Francisco presbyterate to bring in such outsiders," said Coleman, a sociologist who taught at the Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley, Calif.