presbyter

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Related to presbyterate: diaconate

presbyter

1. 
a. an elder of a congregation in the early Christian Church
b. (in some Churches having episcopal politics) an official who is subordinate to a bishop and has administrative, teaching, and sacerdotal functions
2. (in some hierarchical Churches) another name for priest
3. in the Presbyterian Church
a. a teaching elder
b. a ruling elder
References in periodicals archive ?
In "Learning the Ways of Receptive Ecumenism," Gros added the importance of pedagogical and catechetical considerations to his previous appeals concerning the necessity of cultivating ecumenical (and, by implication, relational) receptivity in presbyterate formation.
The invitation was issued on the basis of the Episcopal Church's conviction that recent changes within it in relation to the order of deacons and the ordination of women to the presbyterate, together with the work of the Multilateral Church Conversation, had removed major obstacles to union.
The outreach has brought a renewed energy to the presbyterate in a diocese where a few years ago, morale was low and enthusiasm even lower, said Fr.
The tripartite structure of ordained ministry (diaconate, presbyterate, espiscopate), the papacy, the institution of the sacraments, and the exclusion of women from ordained ministry are just a few examples of what some Christian churches would consider as belonging to ius divinum.
His career also involved ordination to the diaconate and presbyterate, and eventually to his consecration as archbishop of Paris on July 28, 1159.
In ancient Christianity those who were accepted by God's people into the three "orders" of official ministry--diaconate, presbyterate, and episcopate--were empowered ("ordered") by the whole church to serve, teach, and lead the Body in prayer as its official ministers.
In The Church of the Holy Spirit Afanasiev showed how the episcopate and presbyterate necessarily emerged from the royal priesthood of all baptized as required by the eucharistic liturgy.
Commission member Cipriano Vagaggini found that women deacons were ordained by the bishop in the presence of the presbyterate and within the sanctuary by the imposition of hands; Vagaggini published his positive historical analysis of women deacons in an Italian journal two years later.
While many of your points concerning a married presbyterate may raise valid questions, Cones should be clear to readers.
This thinking led me to recall an incident that happened at the end of a three-day conference I gave to a diocese's presbyterate.
3) Among the achievements of Vatican II would be the retrieval of the ancient notion that the church is preeminently manifested "when the holy people of God, all of them, are actively and fully sharing in the same liturgical celebrations--especially when it is the same eucharist--sharing one prayer at one altar, at which the bishop is presiding, surrounded by his presbyterate and his ministers.
2) The Byzantine Church, following historical Christian tradition, (3) excluded women from the ordained orders of the presbyterate (priesthood) and the episcopate based on an anthropology of separate and unequal roles for the sexes, (4) and grounded biblically in the Pauline prohibition against women speaking in church (l Corinthians 14: 34), and particularly on the deutero-Pauline injunction against women teaching (1 Timothy 2:11-12), the latter argued as a result of woman's role in the Fall from grace in the Garden of Eden.