Preservationist

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Preservationist

A person or professional who aspires to, agrees with, and takes action to preserve the natural and built environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
On Preserving collects ten papers providing an overview on foundational issues in preservationism.
See David Schmidtz, When Preservationism Doesn't Preserve, 6 ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES 327 (1997) (noting that treating endangered species as private property may be the only means of preserving them).
Even when Clinton resurfaced as an environmental president in his second term, the globalist/eco-modernist rationalization for his actions was not resurrected; indeed, many of his highest profile acts, like declaring roadless areas in the national forests, were ones done within the tradition of preservationism -- in short, in the name of protecting nature, not as a comprehensive eco-overhaul of society for t he new millennium.
The Ministers reject preservationism -- the `outdated, picture-postcard version' of rural England.
In a June 1998 referendum the voters of California by a wide margin virtually abolished bilingual education in their state, a result that could not have come about had many naturalized citizens not rejected linguistic preservationism in favour of having the schools teach their children English as rapidly as possible.
Hood deploys Richard Rorty's postmodernist position to support environmental preservationism.
He falls to distinguish between preservationism and biocentrism, but preservationism has a strong humanist foundation that is seen most clearly in arguments focusing on why portions of nature should be preserved for the spiritual and/or aesthetic enhancement of human lives.
Preservationism and "village values" triumphed over the modern (Read, 1954: 79-80, 219-225; Sussman, 1968: 104-134).
Oelschlaeger (1991) and Zimmerman (1993) discuss various environmental philosophies, including resource conservationism, preservationism, biocentrism, ecocentrism, deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism.
O'SULLIVAN: In Genesis and elsewhere, you make some very clear distinctions between restoration, on the one hand, and movements like conservationism, preservationism, and deep ecology, on the other.
And while he is partly right--many environmentalists do subscribe to a form of "pure' preservationism that seems a kind of religious misanthropy--both groups also have institutional, bureaucratic reasons to behave as they do.

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