pressed glass


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pressed glass

[′prest ′glas]
(materials)
Glass shaped by being poured into a mold under pressure or pressed into a mold in a plastic state.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pressed glass

Any unit of glass pressed into shape, such as glass block, pavement light, etc.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Enclosed is a photo of a clear pressed glass plate.
Vintage pressed glass serving pieces, including crystal cake plates and bowls belonging to Kennedy's great-grandmother, Mae Valentour Walsh, had been used at family showers, receptions, and celebrations for decades.
The company moved to East Street in 1850 and concentrated on pressed glass manufacture.
In pressed glass, they have invented a glue that adheres pressed glass pieces together, so that three components look like one solid piece.
Vintage pressed glass tumbler, PS3; China Rose essential bedding set, PS19.99/double; blue Ombre Essential bedding set, PS19.99; double Essential knit throw, PS14.99; powder blue chenille cushion, PS6.99.
Striped |laundry bag, PS7, Tiger Stores | Vintage pressed glass tumbler, PS3.
Pressed glass, formed of molten glass pressed into an iron mold, made a strong appearance at Mackinac from the 1890s to around 1913.
Italian aluminium candleholders, PS4 each; coloured pressed glass jug, PS39; coloured pressed glasses, PS7.50 each, Re-found Objects.
He saw the market potential for the pressed glass that Sowerby's, another Gateshead company, had begun producing in the 1840s.
OHNY will also give participants a rare tour of the Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass in Long Island City, a large, one-of-a-kind repository of sheet and pressed glass used by Tiffany Studios.
Croatian will shut left on the nose pressed glass, another It is hard Rangers maintain under such circumstances.
Some of the most common objects among the 10,000 to 12,000 appraised at each "Roadshow" event include family bibles, pressed glass objects, paintings, watches and toys.