pressing

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pressing

1. a large specified number of gramophone records produced at one time from a master record
2. a component formed in a press
3. Football the tactic of trying to stay very close to the opposition when they are in possession of the ball

Pressing

 

the use of pressure to process various materials so as to bring about compaction, changes in shape, separation of the fluid phase from the solid, and changes in the mechanical and other properties of materials. Pressing is used in various industries and agriculture and is usually done on high-pressure presses. (The term “pressing” should not be applied to the production of articles and blanks by forging and stamping in forging presses.)

Distinctions are made between various pressing techniques. Thus, in isostatic pressing, fluid under high pressure is used to mold powdered materials in a closed space. In compressed gas, gas is used to mold powdered materials at high pressures and temperatures. In hydrostatic pressing, fluid under high pressure is used to alter the shape of metallic materials by a process analogous to the compression molding of metals. Another technique, pulse pressing, uses explosions, magnetic-pulse processing, or high-voltage discharge in a fluid.

pressing

[′pres·iŋ]
(engineering acoustics)
A phonograph record produced in a record-molding press from a master or stamper.
(metallurgy)
Shallow-drawing metal sheet or plate.
Using compressive force to form a metal powder compact.
References in periodicals archive ?
The immediate, knee-jerk denigration of youth, and then, not because of anything they have done, but, more pressingly, what they fail to do, is certainly one characteristic not of the Winnebago man in the selection of clips that "went viral" (first through the somewhat laborious reproduction of video tape in the 1990s, and then, through the digital reproduction of these clips online), but of Jack Rebney as presented to us in Ben Steinbauer's film.
In the very same section we find discussions from Mozersky, Meyer and Zimmerman concerning how presentism will fare in its attempts to deal with various problems--most pressingly, the truth-maker problem.
Even more pressingly, especially in a city like Dubai, which is undergoing rapid development and expansion, buildings that have dedicated security systems which feed into a city-wide grid, become essential for the well being of the city.
More pressingly, there are discussions going on now in which we all must engage at length--issues such as climate change, political up heaval, and the lagging world economy.
closely and pressingly examined and most insistently repeated and one
In summary, while it appears that both the SHS and the ICS can potentially be Appropriate Technologies, it can be argued that it is the Improved Cook Stoves (or other improved cooking technologies) which are more pressingly needed in rural Bangladesh and could make the most improvement to the daily lives of rural Bangladeshis, especially women.
And more pressingly, how much is the monthly rental on the tablet?
Coke explores the past but always remains deeply aware of the pressingly urgent concerns of her native Jamaica with its social patterns, class divides, racial complexity, and unpredictable twists, turns, and heart-breaking setbacks.
So true indeed did the hope become that to say that Tate was 'influenced' by Poe is to state the case too lightly: Poe was so hauntingly and pressingly close to Tate that he was like another William Wilson or a Montresor to Tate's Fortunato.
Khartoum refuses to negotiate in good faith on border delineation, oil revenue sharing (approximately 75 percent of Sudan's reserves lie in the South), citizenship and civil rights for southerners who remain in the North, and a host of economic issues, most pressingly the $38 billion in external debt that the National Islamic Front/National Congress Party regime has run up.
The 1,000 strong Trust reckons it will need to raise pounds 1m to buy Wrexham FC from current owners Geoff Moss and Ian Roberts - and more pressingly to settle a pounds 200,000 unpaid bill to the taxman.
The issue resurfaced more pressingly in late 1963 and 1964.