pressure effect


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pressure effect

[′presh·ər i‚fekt]
(spectroscopy)
The effect of changes in pressure on spectral lines in the radiation emitted or absorbed by a substance; namely, pressure broadening and pressure shift.
References in periodicals archive ?
combined] with the shear rate suggests that the dissipation effect predominates over the pressure effect at high shear rates in the orders of [10.
One noticeable low pressure effect is the mild windy conditions.
The fuel injection pressure effects for specific fuel consumption performance of the first experiment have been given in Figure 8.
33) Ibuprofen, piroxicam and naproxen demonstrate the greatest blood pressure effects, whereas sulindac and full-dose aspirin exhibit the least effects.
However, their main purpose was to investigate a particular aerosol generator and not the details of the reactor air pressure effect on the particle formation.
The speciments for the end pressure effect were mechanically tested after 24 hours of curing at room temperature.
This gives it enough momentum to overcome the pressure effect.
The price pressure effect arises from an imbalance between buyers and sellers and a downward sloping demand curve for the stock.
That pressure effect may have practical implications in nanowires where the loss of even a few atoms can spell failure, comments David L.
One possible explanation for the blood pressure effect is that the phytoestrogens supplied by the soy nuts raised production of nitric oxide, an endogenous compound that relaxes blood vessels and lowers blood pressure.
It is possible, moreover, that heterogeneity of target-population lead burden is partially responsible for the inconsistencies seen in the calcium-blood pressure effect across studies.
This causes the pressure effect to last longer and can increase structural damage.