pressure jump

pressure jump

[′presh·ər ‚jəmp]
(meteorology)
A steady-state propagation of a sudden finite change of inversion height, in analogy to the shock wave in a compressible fluid or to a hydraulic jump; the prefrontal squall line has been interpreted as a pressure jump, with the cold front providing the initial pistonlike impetus.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The gust front arrival here is at 2120 UTC, roughly 1 h after it crossed U57A, with a pressure jump of approximately 2 hPa in 4 min.
The pressure jump is more of a gradual ramp-up of 1.
Beran, 1977: The Dulles airport pressure jump detector array for gust front detection.
Different from the most widely used quench cooling techniques, in RC process the melts are solidified by high pressure jump (pressure of the melt can increase from atmospheric pressure to 2.
5 s recorded by a high-speed camera, the melting samples were quickly moved into liquid nitrogen and held there for 10 min (named NQ); in the last one, using a homemade high pressure jump apparatus, the melting samples were solidified through a rapid compression from atmospheric pressure to 2.
I couldn't believe it when I saw the cabin pressure jump from 18,000 feet on our nondigital, barostatic gauge, to 38,000 feet and quickly return to 18,000 feet.
High Blood Pressure Jumps Among Seniors, Especially Blacks
Your blood pressure jumps a notch as you stand there seething, usually next to a hyper child who has clearly overdosed on Smarties.
When the pressure jumps back up, the bubbles violently collapse (SN: 8/24/02, p.
The proportion of people with high blood pressure jumps from 45 percent at age 50 to more than 60 percent at age 60, and to over 70 percent at age 70.
Chronic high blood pressure or blood pressure jumps duringsuccessive incidents of stress may weaken capillaries near the retina and increase the likelihood of developing central serous chorioretinopathy, suggest the researchers.