pressurized water reactor


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Related to pressurized water reactor: boiling water reactor

pressurized water reactor

[′presh·ə‚rīzd ′wȯd·ər rē‚ak·tər]
(nucleonics)
A nuclear reactor in which water is circulated under enough pressure to prevent it from boiling, while serving as moderator and coolant for the uranium fuel; the heated water is then used to produce steam for a power plant. Abbreviated PWR.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the use of the pressurized water reactor for electric power generation was probably inevitable.
These are pressurized water reactors, gas cooled reactors, pressurized heavy water reactors, boiling water reactors and others.
The power plant on the bank of the Danube river operates two Russian-made VVER pressurized water reactors with generation capacity of 1,000 MW each.
The NPP will be equipped with Russia-made pressurized water reactors.
Reactors applying for resumption of their operations have so far all been pressurized water reactors, which are different from the type of reactors that suffered core meltdowns at Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s Fukushima Daiichi plant.
Coverage encompasses corrosion in pressurized water reactors, materials aging in particular components (zirconium alloys, electric cables), management strategies, and areas needing research.
The country started to construct its new pressurized water reactors in 2009, the first to use AP1000 technologies developed by Westinghouse.
China began constructing its first third-generation pressurized water reactors in 2009, but the progress was delayed by six months due to the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in Japan.
The pressurized water reactors will become operational between 2012 and 2016, producing 1,000 MWe each EoACAo enough to power around 1 million homes by Western standards.
These include the presure "suppression pools' (wells in boiling water reactors where steam can condense during an accident, but which might also filter out some fission products); ice condensing systems in some pressurized water reactors; and auxiliary buildings.
Most of the world's operating nuclear plants adopt second generation pressurized water reactors, Xinhua News reports.
pressurized water reactors have already developed NRC-approved analysis and testing to show that their sumps will not clog.