presuppression

presuppression

[¦prē·sə′presh·ən]
(geophysics)
In seismic prospecting, the suppression of the early events on a seismic record for control of noise and reflections on that portion of the record.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first part of the conclusion (411-26) offers both a window into visitor Palmeiro's spiritual life and a case study in the genre of early modern necrology; the second part (426-42) poses a convincing scholarly challenge to interpretations of the presuppression Jesuits as actors of "global" effect.
This would provide better information for decision making on presuppression activities.
(3) The increasing trend in correlation between burned area (fire size)and the number of consecutive dry days defined by the identified threshold of daily rainfall amount from the small fire group to large fire group manifests that the threshold of daily rainfall identified for each ecoregion will be useful for presuppression activities of large, severe fires (e.g., > 100 ha).
The bill modifies terms and conditions of GRP contracts and easements to permit fire presuppression and addition of grazing-related activities, such as fencing and livestock watering.
Congress responded to the excess-fuels story by increasing Forest Service fuel treatment budgets from about $10 million a year in 1990 to about $70 million a year in 2000 and by more than doubling presuppression or preparedness budgets, from $167 million to $409 million, over the same time period.
The response was to triple the funding for fuel treatments and increase presuppression funding by more than 50 percent.
An additional incentive for Forest Service administrators to seek input and cooperation from other jurisdictions was linked to a newly established internal policy that required wildfire presuppression activities to be undertaken in a cost-effective manner.
The appropriated sums for FY 1997 for preparedness (presuppression) and suppression were $319.3 million and $210.7 million, respectively, for a total of $530.0 million (see U.S.
Meteorologists in Boise then make daily, or even hourly, presuppression forecasts.
This was the case, for example, in China, and also in Canada, where the last remaining ex-Jesuit from the presuppression era, Jean-Joseph Casot (1728-1800), would die in 1800.
In terms of Jesuit self-identity during the 19th century, creating links with the presuppression Society and sustaining long-standing traditions was of the utmost importance.
It would be reasonable to suggest that the majority of work on Jesuit history is still dedicated to the presuppression era.