prickle


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prickle

Botany a pointed process arising from the outer layer of a stem, leaf, etc., and containing no woody or conducting tissue
References in periodicals archive ?
"About four weeks ago I found a poorly one and was told about Prickle Bums and that's what started out acquaintance.
Very light body, mouthwatering long-lasting acid, no astringency, medium plus alcohol 13 percent throws very little heat, but offers a slight prickle on the lips.
"A little hop prickle on the tongue, and there's good malt in there, it's well-balanced.
These days she could even bring enough classy sassy style to The Locomotion without anyone in the audience feeling the slightest prickle of embarrassment run down their backs.
No matter how careful I am, I still manage to get several prickle injuries that annoy me for several days, but I consider the perfume from my roses very much worth the pain.
If I forget, or am ill, I feel that old prickle in my lip and one comes.
The leaf blade has a characteristic cuticular wax pattern, composed of dense rod-like structures, and is surrounded by papillae, zipper-like silica cells, abundant bulky prickle trichomes, and hooked trichomes.
Mr Prickle can strike for trainer Peter Beaumont in the Pat De Clermont Handicap Chase at Kelso.
The subdued, rather traditionally composed landscapes are also undeniably romantic, though they provoke less a powerful longing for distant havens than a sort of dry prickle of backyard environmentalism.
That classic portrayal of passing can rouse a nasty prickle of suspicion, sympathy and hostility amongst people of color who feel betrayed, or those in the majority who feel tricked.
First you feel a little tickle, And your nose begins to prickle. Then your throat begins to twitch, And your tongue begins to itch.
The novel is filled with aggressive words like forced, stalked, fierce, prickle; it attacks us and, in an odd way, makes us aware of Virgil's position.