prime mover


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prime mover:

see energy, sources ofenergy, sources of,
origins of the power used for transportation, for heat and light in dwelling and working areas, and for the manufacture of goods of all kinds, among other applications.
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prime mover

[′prīm ′müv·ər]
(anatomy)
A muscle that produces a specific motion or maintains a specific posture.
(mechanical engineering)
The component of a power plant that transforms energy from the thermal or the pressure form to the mechanical form.
A tractor or truck, usually with four-wheel drive, used for hauling tasks.

Prime mover

The component of a power plant that transforms energy from the thermal or the pressure form to the mechanical form. Mechanical energy may be in the form of a rotating or a reciprocating shaft, or a jet for thrust or propulsion. The prime mover is frequently called an engine or turbine and is represented by such machines as waterwheels, hydraulic turbines, steam engines, steam turbines, windmills, gas turbines, internal combustion engines, and jet engines. These prime movers operate by either of two principles: (1) balanced expansion, positive displacement, intermittent flow of a working fluid into and out of a piston and cylinder mechanism so that by pressure difference on the opposite sides of the piston, or its equivalent, there is relative motion of the machine parts; or (2) free continuous flow through a nozzle where fluid acceleration in a jet (and vane) mechanism gives relative motion to the machine parts by impulse, reaction, or both. See Gas turbine, Hydraulic turbine, Impulse turbine, Internal combustion engine, Power plant, Reaction turbine, Steam engine, Steam turbine, Turbine

prime mover

1. Any machine that converts fuel (e.g., diesel oil, gasoline, or natural gas) or steam into mechanical energy.
2. A powerful truck, tractor, or the like.

prime mover

1. 
a. the source of power, such as fuel, wind, electricity, etc., for a machine
b. the means of extracting power from such a source, such as a steam engine, electric motor, etc.
2. (in the philosophy of Aristotle) that which is the cause of all movement
References in periodicals archive ?
Compare the electric load with EPM (Section D): If the electric energy output from the prime mover is less than the electric load, it would be necessary to obtain electricity from the grid.
For the load combination labeled 3, the prime mover could use TLF (point f), depending on the grid to provide electrical power [DELTA][E.
These realities offer three obvious but under-appreciated conclusions about the mechanical prime movers that are the foundations of our economic progress.
Everything in the universe moves in some imitation of the prime mover.
1) The prime mover view, however, is not at all inconsistent with these theories; it simply holds that prime movers are major underlying causes of changes, for example, in new orders or profits.
This research service analyzes only the prime movers market in the oil and gas industry in North America.
Tumulak said the victims came from Cebu City and were heading home to Talisay area when they collided with the prime mover at 3:44 a.
Sentencing Fishley, Recorder Michael Stephens told him: "You may not have been the prime mover, but there was some element of pre-planning, and you were a willing participant.
Detecting high-Btu gas, such as from a plant upset, protects the prime mover which can be an engine or turbine.
Kevin Parker, 45, was convinced he was "the saviour of the second coming" and his 75-year-old dad was "a prime mover in the conspiracy to destroy the world".
Recognized as a prime mover (see "Presenting the Presenters: Killacky and White," Dance Magazine, May 2000, page 56), White led DTW to prominence as a scout for new talent and a nexus of international activity.
Every single prime mover or jeep-type vehicle started without any assistance.