primrose

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Related to primroses: English primrose

primrose,

common name for the genus Primula of the Primulaceae, a family of low perennial herbs with species found on all continents, most frequently in north temperate regions. Among the better-known members of the family are the primroses (genus Primula), cyclamens (genus Cyclamen), pimpernels (genus Anagallis), and loosestrifes (chiefly genus Lysimachia). Species of all these genera are cultivated as rock-garden, border, and pot plants. The primrose, a common and favored wildflower of England, has often been celebrated in poetry. A common yellow species (P. veris) is called cowslip in England. Several primroses are indigenous to North America. The American cowslip, often called shooting star, is a separate genus (Dodocatheon); it is an Eastern wildflower. The evening primroseevening primrose,
common name for the Onagraceae, a family of plants of worldwide distribution, most species of which grow as herbs in the temperate New World, and specifically for members of the genus Oenothera.
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 is not a true primrose. Tuberous-rooted cyclamens are native chiefly to the European Alps; C. indicum is a common florists' pot plant in the United States. The scarlet pimpernel, or poorman's-weatherglass (A. arvensis), is native to Eurasia but has been naturalized in North America; its flowers close on the approach of bad weather. Loosestrifes are easily cultivated flowers that thrive under moist conditions; some are creeping species, e.g., the moneywort, or creeping Jenny, of E North America. Several unrelated plants are also called loosestrifeloosestrife,
common name for the Lythraceae, a widely distributed family of plants most abundant as woody shrubs in the American tropics but including also herbaceous species (chiefly of temperate zones) and some trees.
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. Primroses are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Primulales.
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primrose

primrose

Colorful, edible flower with sweet, bland taste. Note there is another plant also called Cowslip (Marsh Marigold) which isn’t the same.

primrose

symbol of early youth. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 176; Kunz, 327]
See: Youth

primrose


primrose

1. any of various temperate primulaceous plants of the genus Primula, esp P. vulgaris of Europe, which has pale yellow flowers
2. short for evening primrose
3. a light to moderate yellow, sometimes with a greenish tinge
References in periodicals archive ?
springing up Spotting some common primroses will brighten up a woodland walk
The primrose came out top in a Plantlife survey in Wales, followed by the bluebell in second place and a surprise third favourite, the wood anemone.
Take a few seed pods from your primroses when they are fat but still green, te ar back the outside casing of the old calyx, then burst the membrane with your nail and squeeze to expose seeds.
No doubt wild primroses have found their way into gardens from the very first time plots were set aside to cultivate food and though they can be used as food and drink - primrose wine must be a delicacy - it is for the joy they bring to spirit and soul that they are prized.
But this is not necessarily the case with primroses as many of new strains retain a strong sweet fragrance.
With its beautiful, bright-yellow flowers, water primrose might seem like the perfect aquatic plant to enhance a serene backyard pond.
Double primroses have been known since medieval times and someone seeing an oddity or a sport in the wild may have decided to grow it on for the garden.
In the bed above, deep pink primroses play off the purple-leafed heuchera, pale yellow daffodils, and pink azaleas (Belgian Indica hybrids).
DESPITE the cold weather of recent weeks, I have had a small patch of the wild primrose, flowering their heads off since before Christmas, and cannot think of a better harbinger of spring.
Like bright jewels spilled over the dark earth, primroses add sparkle to the winter garden.