principal

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principal

1. (in Britain) a civil servant of an executive grade who is in charge of a section
2. Law
a. a person who engages another to act as his agent
b. an active participant in a crime
c. the person primarily liable to fulfil an obligation
3. the head of a school or other educational institution
4. (in Scottish schools) a head of department
5. Music
a. the chief instrumentalist in a section of the orchestra
b. one of the singers in an opera company
c. either of two types of open diapason organ stops, one of four-foot length and pitch and the other of eight-foot length and pitch
6. the leading performer in a play

principal

1. One on whose behalf or in whose name binding transactions may be entered into by another, usually called the agent.
2. One for whose debt or default another (called a surety) promises to make good.
3. In professional practice, any person legally responsible for the activities of such practice.
4. In a framed structure, a most important member, such as a truss which supports the roof.
References in periodicals archive ?
The result of such structural reforms leads to deep changes in the principalship (Gronn, 2003).
Key Words: Principalship, Sex stereotyping, Family responsibilities
Clearly, to fulfill the necessary demands of an urban principalship, and engage in these other activities means Clark, though controversial in his methods, goes beyond the call of duty.
Starr and White (2008) studied small rural schools in Australia and found that a deep understanding of context is crucial to appreciating the complexities and challenges of rural principalship.
In addition, it was also revealed that there was no significant difference between the school principals' experience in school principalship and their leadership behavior regarding the supply and use of educational technologies ([F.
The National Commission on the Principalship (NCP), a joint effort of NASSP and the National Association of Elementary School Principals, was established in 1988 to influence the licensing of principals and to explore the development of a national certification process.
The lead article of the focus section provides an overview of a new partnership between Creighton University and the Archdiocese of Omaha that has been developed to respond to the need for leadership succession in the principalship of the Catholic schools of the archdiocese.
We are investing in the necessary recruitment, training and ongoing development that will cultivate top-line talent into the principalship and ultimately lead to improved student achievement, particularly in our urban schools.
In 2002 McGowan agreed to take on the principalship of the College.
Besides, says Seleznow, a former principal in Montgomery County, Maryland, "There's no experience that can totally prepare you for your first principalship.
Thomas Bellamy, Connie Fulmer, and Rodney Muth authored "Five Ideas for Reframing the Principalship.
The impetus to reform leadership education stems from increased pressure on schools from high-stakes accountability policies, and the realization that demands on the principalship have shifted from mostly managerial responsibilities to instructional leadership (Kochan, Jackson, & Duke, 1999).