principal

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principal

1. (in Britain) a civil servant of an executive grade who is in charge of a section
2. Law
a. a person who engages another to act as his agent
b. an active participant in a crime
c. the person primarily liable to fulfil an obligation
3. the head of a school or other educational institution
4. (in Scottish schools) a head of department
5. Music
a. the chief instrumentalist in a section of the orchestra
b. one of the singers in an opera company
c. either of two types of open diapason organ stops, one of four-foot length and pitch and the other of eight-foot length and pitch
6. the leading performer in a play

principal

1. One on whose behalf or in whose name binding transactions may be entered into by another, usually called the agent.
2. One for whose debt or default another (called a surety) promises to make good.
3. In professional practice, any person legally responsible for the activities of such practice.
4. In a framed structure, a most important member, such as a truss which supports the roof.
References in periodicals archive ?
After 1930, the number of women in principalships and superintendencies declined (Shakeshaft 1989).
14) for example, suggest that while 'there are far more people "qualified" for a principalship in the United States than there are jobs for them to fill', supply problems exist in pockets.
Disincentives to the principalship included lack of support from the employing authority, inadequate pay, isolation, growing responsibilities, difficult parents, and interfering pastors.
He thought that his prestigious MBA, private-sector experience, and nine years as a classroom teacher would distinguish him from more traditional applicants for the principalship.
Consider the following excerpt from an actual job listing recently posted for an elementary principalship in a large, urban school system:
The training ground for most principals and other school leaders is the assistant principalship which is often perceived as a transitional position (Marshall, et al.
Another important aspect in which public and private school principalships differ is how principals perceive the problems at their school.
This same research indicated that a high-school principalship was evaluated as only 'moderately desirable' by middle-school principal and assistant high-school principal study respondents.
poverty, lack of family support) make it difficult to focus on instruction; testing/accountability pressures are too great; the job is viewed as less satisfying than it had been previously; inadequate funding is available for schools; continuing bad press/public relations problems for the district place pressure on principals; principalships and assistant principalships lack tenure.
Before 1989, small primary school principalships played an important part in teaching career paths and principal development.
For assistant principalships, the average number of applications per vacancy in 1985 was 47 but by 1999 it was a mere 7.