principle of covariance

principle of covariance

[′prin·sə·pəl əv kō′ver·ē·əns]
(relativity)
In classical physics and in special relativity, the principle that the laws of physics take the same mathematical form in all inertial reference frames.
In general relativity, the principle that the laws of physics take the same mathematical form in all conceivable curvilinear coordinate systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
The principle of covariance states the laws of physics must adopt the same form in all coordinate systems.
This kind of inconsistency is expectedly inevitable because of contradictory principles, Einstein's equivalence principle that requires space-time coordinates have physical meaning and the "principle of covariance" that necessarily means that coordinates are arbitrary, are concurrently used in Einstein's theory [11].
Zhou [21] is probably the earliest who spoke out against the "principle of covariance" and he pointed out, "The concept that coordinates don't matter in the interpretation of Einstein's theory necessarily leads to mathematical results which can hardly have a physical interpretation and are therefore a mystification of the theory." More recently, Morrison [12] commented that Einstein's "covariance principle" discontinuously separates special relativity from general relativity.
Any parallels between a story and the story of the universe are assisted by the principle of covariance. Covariance describes that laws of science are consistent in all frames of reference, and the principle, developed by Albert Einstein, does not distinguish between synthetic or organic environments.
154); and (2) Whitehead's later work can be reconstructed in its formation and systematic interconnections, if we make foundational the general principle of covariance as the leitmotiv for the interpretation of natural and perceptual processes (p.
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