prism binoculars

prism binoculars

[′priz·əm bə′näk·yə·lərz]
(optics)
A type of binoculars, each half of which is a Kepler telescope that employs a Porro prism erecting system both to erect the image and to reduce the length of the instrument. Also known as prismatic binoculars.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Unlike the other European optical giants such as Carl Zeiss, Hensoldt, Meopta and Swarovski, Steiner made its name building Porro prism binoculars. A German company, Steiner rose to prominence from the ashes of the Second World War.
The military source mentioned that the seized weapons included 45 machineguns, 13 Nato sniper rifles, 9 RPG launchers, 7 BKC machineguns, 3 mortars, 3 hand-made rockets, 14 pump-action rifles, 10 military pistols, 24 mortar shells, 32 RPG shells, 53 machinegun chargers, 30 sniper rifle chargers, 8 explosive devices, 10 grenades, 150 detonators, 1500 sniper rifle bullets, 5000 BKC machinegun bullets, 4200 machinegun bullets, 500 pistol bullets, 7 gas masks, 5 prism binoculars, 25 satellite wireless devices, 30 shields, in addition to materials for making explosive devices, explosives and large amounts of gunpowder, TNT templates, highly explosive C4 material, a field hospital and an amount of military equipment, stolen cars and registration licenses.
This is not to say that there are not many excellent roof prism binoculars in the market, but good quality roof prism designs tend to be expensive and cheaper models usually give poor images, certainly on astronomical objects.
In 1978 they introduced their compact Dach series of lightweight roof prism binoculars. These won acclaim when they were included in New York's Museum of Modern Art's permanent collection.
Going a different route on the rangefinder/optics integration, the Bushnell Fusion 1600 ARC combines 10x42 BaK-4 roof prism binoculars with a built-in rangefinder capable of measuring distances as close as 10 yards and as far out as 1,600.
Do you prefer Porro or roof prism binoculars? Do you need a large field of view?
I recommend Roof Prism binoculars all the way (the one with straight barrels).
INTRODUCED IN 2009, Leupold's Rogue Porro prism binoculars have become such a hit that the company has expanded the line this year with two new models.
Back to the popular preference for Roof Prism binoculars: in general, it requires more cost to make a Roof Prism binocular as good as a Porro Prism binocular.
An example is the Weaver 10X42 Roof Prism binoculars (also available in 8X42) that have a suggested retail price of just over $400.
Newest are the SLC 7x42 and 10x42 roof prism binoculars. These compact and light weight (about 30 ozs.) models have internal focusing and central dioptric compensation mechanisms that help make them completely water tight to a pressure depth of 4.25 lb./square inch.
Don't leave spotting in low-light conditions to chance-invest in KOWA's Genesis 8X33 roof prism binoculars ($1,285; www.kowa-usa.com) for unparalleled performance no matter the time of day.