privacy policy


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privacy policy

A declaration made by an organization regarding its use of personal information that you give it. Due to the countless opportunities for purchasing merchandise as well as signing up and receiving newsletters and other periodic information, privacy policies have become popular on the Web. Such policies state whether third parties may have access to your data and how that data will be used. They may also indicate whether cookies are used. See privacy.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the FTC and private plaintiffs are focused on an issue, companies do well to pay attention: An ounce of prevention now in the form of a well-crafted privacy policy and an equally well-crafted insurance program may save companies a very expensive pound of cure later.
Developing a privacy policy that is clear, accurate and conspicuously accessible to users and potential users; and
Privacy policy data on these firms was gathered in December 2000.
Now any company that handles personal information about consumers should have a privacy policy and privacy practices in place.
My Privacy Policy offers consumers and enterprises the unique opportunity to assume greater responsibility for protecting the integrity of their personal data and take a more proactive role in addressing this expanding problem.
Nor can the whole problem be avoided by simply having a privacy policy that the user accepts by clicking `yes' on the ubiquitous privacy policy acceptance screen, agreeing to the re-sale of his or her personal information.
For more information about Vertis and its Safe Harbor Privacy Policy, please contact Donovan Roche or Michelle Metter at 619-234-0345.
The audit had two objectives: (1) to assess whether the university's goals regarding the protection of faculty and staff personal information were effectively met during the period May 1, 1995, to April 30, 1999, and (2) to determine whether the existing level of protection provided by the privacy policy was appropriate.
The sites were evaluated for privacy policy functionality and compliance with the "Fair Information Practices" -- a set of principles providing basic privacy protection, in addition to other criteria such as cookies and participation in trusted third-party programs.
For example, IBM can evaluate where personal identifiable information is gathered from a company's Web site, how it is secured, with whom the information is shared, and if that process is consistent with the company's privacy policy.

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