privet

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privet

(prĭv`ĭt), any plant of the genus Ligustrum, Old World shrubs or small trees of the family Oleaceae (oliveolive,
common name for the Oleaceae, a family of trees and shrubs (including climbing forms) of warm temperate climates and of the Old World tropics, especially Asia and the East Indies.
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 family), some of which are common as hedge plants. Privet hedges are popular for their dark green leaves and their ease of cultivation even in adverse city conditions. The various species are evergreen, nearly evergreen, or deciduous, some producing small white flowers in profusion. They are usually propagated by cuttings. The common privet (L. vulgare) has become naturalized in the E United States; the California privet (L. ovalifolium) is a native of Japan. Privet is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Scrophulariales.

privet

a. any oleaceous shrub of the genus Ligustrum, esp L. vulgare or L. ovalifolium, having oval dark green leaves, white flowers, and purplish-black berries
b. (as modifier): #5a privet hedge
References in periodicals archive ?
The mean percent defoliation for Chinese privet per year among all sites and all years of study was 20.
Phassus excrescens (Lepidoptera: Hepialoidae) was the only stem borer found feeding on Chinese privet in our survey where 5.
Six species of insects were found feeding on roots of Chinese privet.
Guizhou province was another important survey area because it is near the center of the range of Chinese privet in China.
Chinese privet is a common ornamental shrub but not a noxious weed in China, suggesting that natural enemies suppress populations.
We included all insects found on privet, not just the most common ones, because some insects that are rare in their native country and suppressed by their own natural enemies are effective biological control agents when released from their own population regulating fauna.
Due to host specificity and the severe damage it caused on Chinese privet (Zhang et al.
Leptoypha hospita could be another promising biocontrol agent because it has a limited host range in the Oleaceae (Li 2001) and often occurred in high numbers on Chinese privet in our sample areas.
This research is part of an ongoing Sino-US Chinese privet biological control cooperative program funded by the USDA-Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Research Work Unit 4552, and the Natural National Science Foundation of China (30525009, 30621003).
Effects of application rate, timing and formulation of glyphosate and triclopyr for control of Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense).