privilege


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privilege

1. any of the fundamental rights guaranteed to the citizens of a country by its constitution
2. 
a. the right of a lawyer to refuse to divulge information obtained in confidence from a client
b. the right claimed by any of certain other functionaries to refuse to divulge information
3. the rights and immunities enjoyed by members of most legislative bodies, such as freedom of speech, freedom from arrest in civil cases during a session, etc.

Privilege

 

the granting of some concession; a partial exemption from fulfilling established rules or obligations (tax privileges or pension privileges) or the easing of the conditions of their fulfillment.

privilege

(1) The rights granted to a single user or group of users who operate a computer. Administrative privileges allow a user the right to make any and all changes in the computer, including setting up accounts for other users. User-level privileges are more restricted. See access rights.

(2) The rights granted to software running in the computer, which determines which hardware and software resources can be accessed and changed. See privileged mode and access mode.
References in periodicals archive ?
Checking one's privilege is defined by Urban Dictionary as 'a phrase for when one makes an ignorant remark about another's life issues.
For example, living in a comfortable home in a safe neighborhood with good, safe schools is often given as an example of "white privilege," as is being able to read history books in school filled with stories about people of one's own race.
Granting agencies that sought-after control through a privilege delegation will imperil key federal and state regulatory and governance interests.
The term privilege in its original sense means private legislation; "privus" refers to individual, while "legis" refers to law.
Technological innovations are problematic for privilege claims since they provide increased visibility into ostensibly confidential communications.
The privilege, which may be asserted in noncriminal tax proceedings in federal court, is an extension of the attorney-client privilege to tax advice provided by nonattorney tax practitioners.
As a general matter, attorney communications with at least certain members of an entity's management can be subject to the privilege.
Often cited as one of the oldest and most necessary privileges, the attorney-client privilege has a long history in the common law.
Second, because the privilege shields relevant and sometimes critical information, judges have disfavored it, creating numerous "exceptions" to the privilege.
GAO was asked to testify on (1) how VA credentials and privileges physicians working in its medical facilities and (2) the extent to which VA has implemented the three recommendations made in GAO's May 2006 report that address VA's privileging requirements.
Because established legal privileges provide insufficient protection for companies, many commentators have suggested application of the self-critical analysis privilege.
To help determine the extent to which the erosion of the attorney-client privilege is a problem in the state, the Bar's Attorney-Client Privilege Task Force wants to hear from Florida lawyers.