privilege


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privilege

1. any of the fundamental rights guaranteed to the citizens of a country by its constitution
2. 
a. the right of a lawyer to refuse to divulge information obtained in confidence from a client
b. the right claimed by any of certain other functionaries to refuse to divulge information
3. the rights and immunities enjoyed by members of most legislative bodies, such as freedom of speech, freedom from arrest in civil cases during a session, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Privilege

 

the granting of some concession; a partial exemption from fulfilling established rules or obligations (tax privileges or pension privileges) or the easing of the conditions of their fulfillment.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

privilege

(1) The rights granted to a single user or group of users who operate a computer. Administrative privileges allow a user the right to make any and all changes in the computer, including setting up accounts for other users. User-level privileges are more restricted. See access rights.

(2) The rights granted to software running in the computer, which determines which hardware and software resources can be accessed and changed. See privileged mode and access mode.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
The reflections from the first group indicated that these students were surprised to know that "White Privilege" exists because they believed in a meritocracy.
The Sinn Fein deputy leader was not penalised after the Dail's committee on procedures and privilege made a ruling this week.
This Article is the first to grapple with the implications of migrating the power to write rules of privilege from Congress and the courts, on the one hand, to the executive branch, on the other.
The term privilege in its original sense means private legislation; "privus" refers to individual, while "legis" refers to law.
Technological innovations are problematic for privilege claims since they provide increased visibility into ostensibly confidential communications.
With few exceptions, when the privilege attaches it protects both the attorney and the client from being compelled to reveal certain information and advice.
This collection of over a dozen essays explores best practices and research surrounding the question of privilege, defined here as unearned group advantages.
That the benefits of enacting a privilege against disclosure of confidential communications in mediation outweigh any detriments is attested to by the creation of the Uniform Mediation Act, (6) a centerpiece of which is its inclusion of a mediation privilege.
The funds refused, citing both attorney-client privilege and the work-product privilege.
Now integrated with BeyondTrust's BeyondInsight platform, organizations can achieve critical security and compliance requirements of enterprise-wide least privilege more quickly and easily than ever before.
ISLAMABAD -- Minister for Information and Broadcasting Chaudhry Fawad Hussain on Friday said that any move for privilege motion on under investigation case is against the provisions of Constitution.