privilege

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privilege

1. any of the fundamental rights guaranteed to the citizens of a country by its constitution
2. 
a. the right of a lawyer to refuse to divulge information obtained in confidence from a client
b. the right claimed by any of certain other functionaries to refuse to divulge information
3. the rights and immunities enjoyed by members of most legislative bodies, such as freedom of speech, freedom from arrest in civil cases during a session, etc.

Privilege

 

the granting of some concession; a partial exemption from fulfilling established rules or obligations (tax privileges or pension privileges) or the easing of the conditions of their fulfillment.

privilege

(1) The rights granted to a single user or group of users who operate a computer. Administrative privileges allow a user the right to make any and all changes in the computer, including setting up accounts for other users. User-level privileges are more restricted. See access rights.

(2) The rights granted to software running in the computer, which determines which hardware and software resources can be accessed and changed. See privileged mode and access mode.
References in classic literature ?
I do not dispute that, but it cannot be denied that court privileges have attained the same end," returned Prince Andrew.
No," said Prince Andrew, "my father did not wish me to take advantage of the privilege.
An institution upholding honor, the source of emulation, is one similar to the Legion d'honneur of the great Emperor Napoleon, not harmful but helpful to the success of the service, but not a class or court privilege.
Yet you do not care to avail yourself of the privilege, Prince," said Speranski, indicating by a smile that he wished to finish amiably an argument which was embarrassing for his companion.
The institution of Senatorial Privilege enabled the Roman Republic to conquer the world.
If you look at society as a whole from this point of view, you will soon see, as I do, that the privilege of election ought only to be exercised by men who possess wealth, power, or intelligence, and you will likewise see that the action of the deputies they may choose to represent them should be considerably restricted.
I had not had the privilege of sitting down to a dining-table until I was quite well grown.
Washington and myself a reception, at which we had the privilege of meeting some of the best people in England.
It was a great privilege to meet throughout England those who had known and honoured the late William Lloyd Garrison, the Hon.
Yet our online conversations manifest our privileges nonetheless.
I was in a conversation recently with someone (who is non-white) who, after hearing me deny that there was any such thing as "white privilege," told me that I just have to admit it, and come to grips with the fact that I've been afforded certain privileges solely because of my skin color.
Privileges abound in federal law, but until now, they have been defined either by statute or judicial opinion.