probation

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probation,

method by which the punishment of a convicted offender is conditionally suspended. The offender must remain in the community and under the supervision of a probation officer, who is usually a court-appointed official. In theory, probation is not a form of leniency but is intended for offenders whose rehabilitation can be better achieved by community care than by imprisonment. However, the offender's original sentence remains in force and can be invoked should he violate the provisions of the probation. Probation differs from paroleparole
, in criminal law, release from prison of a convict before the expiration of his term on condition that his activities be restricted and that he report regularly to an officer.
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 in that the latter requires the offender to have served a portion of his sentence in an institution. The first law in the United States that established the essentials of a modern probation system was enacted in Massachusetts in 1878; in 2010 some 4 million people were on probation in the United States.

probation

1. a system of dealing with offenders by placing them under the supervision of a probation officer
2. on probation
a. under the supervision of a probation officer
b. undergoing a test period
References in periodicals archive ?
162) The likelihood that a probationer will learn to do so successfully is increased by the imposition of probation conditions that interfere in the least drastic way with normal community living.
A PhD, four MPhils, and 128 postgraduates were among the probationer sub-inspectors.
For example, regulations governing the amount of time a probationer serves for a revocation varied across the sites.
It is interesting to note that in case the probationer fails in successfully completing the period of probation in initial appointment, he is to be discharged from the service, however, in case he is undergoing probation as a result of promotion or transfer and fails to complete the said period satisfactorily, first, he is to be reverted to his original post and against which he holds lien and in case of non availability of post he is to be discharged.
In 1992, along with Judge Joseph Dever, Chief Justice of the Lynn district court, and Valrie Harris, a probation officer from that same court, I started the first CLTL program for women, who comprise twenty percent of the 89,000 Massachusetts probationers.
The dismissal frustrated the only male probationer who filed suit, alleging that Walker violated his civil rights by falsely telling him his three-year probation was actually five years so as to have continued access to the man's home and wife.
Probation officers are best known for their work in courthouses around the state, where they meet with probationers and provide judges with information needed to decide what sentence to impose, including whether to place the person on probation as part of that sentence.
37) Notably, the majority of cases where a probationer was found to have violated probation and had his probation revoked and the revocation was reversed on appeal, turn on the issue of whether the evidence offered to prove the violation was sufficient, not inadmissible.
The sight prepared her for far worse below and she ran down to the platform with a bunch of other young probationers.
First, there were significantly more men in the violent probationer group (77.
Aim reasoned that a brief stint behind bars would make the probationer more cooperative when he returned to his officer's caseload.
Second, a multivariate model was generated using the entire sample of felony probationers (Cook County and the rest of Illinois) to examine the independent effects on recidivism of each of the predictor variables, including whether a probationer was supervised in Cook County.