procedure turn


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Related to procedure turn: procedure turn inbound

procedure turn

[prə′sē·jər ‚tərn]
(navigation)
A constant-rate turn of an aircraft in flight; used for computing the radius of turn and time required for its execution when very accurate navigation is required in controlling time or maintaining accurate, predetermined tracks.

procedure turn

procedure turn
Procedure turn left.
A maneuver in which a turn is made away from designated track followed by a turn in the opposite direction, both turns being executed so as to permit aircraft to intercept and proceed along the reciprocal of the designated track (ICAO). A procedure turn may be made either in a level flight or while descending. Depending on the initial turn, a procedure turn may be “left” or “right.” It is the maneuver prescribed when it is necessary to perform a course reversal to establish the aircraft inbound on an intermediate or final approach course. The procedure turn, or hold in lieu of a procedure turn, is a required maneuver for pilot training currency. The procedure turn is not required when the symbol “No PT” is shown, when radar vectoring to the final approach course is provided, when conducting a timed approach, or when the procedure turn is not authorized. The hold in lieu of a procedure turn is not required when radar vectoring to the final approach course is provided or when “No PT” is shown. The altitude prescribed for the procedure turn is a minimum altitude until the aircraft is established on the inbound course. The maneuver must be completed within the distance specified in the profile view.
References in periodicals archive ?
Typically, the procedure turn will be charted as a barbed 45/180, an example of which is the VOR Runway 14 procedure at KSRQ, excerpted below.
Course reversals come in three flavors: the traditional procedure turn, the hold-in-lieu-of procedure turn (HILPT), and the teardrop (or penetration) turn.
The right answer is, "Any damn way I wanted to." It's just a procedure turn barb with no fix shown.
Look at each pattern and you'll see that, in addition to serving as an exercise to fine-tune aircraft control in IMC, they artfully duplicate the various maneuvers necessary to fly an instrument approach: procedure turns, instrument let-downs, missed approaches and holds.
A procedure turn is designed when it is necessary to reverse direction to get an aircraft established on an intermediate or final approach course, to facilitate a descent to procedure turn altitude, or to intercept an inbound course far enough out to join the final approach segment.
Here's part of what the Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM) has to say about procedure turns and holding: "The procedure turn or hold-in-lieu-of-PT is a required maneuver when it is depicted on the approach chart, unless cleared by ATC for a straight-in approach.
Another frequent IFR pilot mistake is to descend too soon during a procedure turn. Most of us do not fly a lot of procedure turns or holding pattern-style course reversals in our everyday flying, so we don't have the depth of experience in the maneuver that we do in other arrival procedures.
It would be more correct to say that the altitude at which you enter the procedure turn is specified on the procedure than to say the altitude is mandatory.
These days, it's rare to do the full procedure, i.e., execute the procedure turn. Instead, ATC usually vectors a flight to join the final approach course somewhere between the initial approach fix (IAF) and the final approach fix (FAF), or we join an approach segment accompanied by the notation "NoPT." Yet, a recent issue of the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System publication Callback highlighted how confusing the procedure turn/no procedure turn decision can be.
The short answer is that, by the book you're required to fly the hold in lieu of procedure turn (HILPT), even though it's only an 89-degree turn.
Radar plots reveal the airplane overflew HDN at 11,400 feet and proceeded outbound for the procedure turn, descending to 10,800 feet.
Imagine you're holding over an airport's VOR at 3000 feet, requesting a VOR approach with a full procedure turn. Traffic is inbound, descending out of 2000 on the same approach.

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