procoagulant


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procoagulant

[¦prō·kō′ag·yə·lənt]
(biochemistry)
Any of blood clotting factors V to VIII; accelerates the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin in the presence of thromboplastin and calcium.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the activity of Vitamin K-dependent procoagulant factors is inhibited by warfarin at a much slower rate due to the longer half-lives of these factors (Table).
These methods can be combined with the use of platelet agonists to measure dense granules, as well as release, aggregation, microparticle formation, and platelet procoagulant activity.
METHODS: We used freshly isolated human erythrocytes and ex vivo and in vivo thrombosis models in rats to investigate mercury-induced procoagulant activity.
It is currently widely accepted that a protein S deficiency is a significant contributor to the procoagulant nature of HIV disease.
Insulin resistance affects the procoagulant state by co-segregating with abnormalities involved in coagulation, including platelet aggregability, platelet adhesion and increased levels of thromboxane, von Willebrand factor, factor VIII, tissue plasminogen activator and fibrinogen.
Based on research in AMAA runners, an acute inflammatory response with procoagulant effects during rhabdomyolysis may play a role in triggering sudden cardiac death, analogous perhaps to acute cardiac events related to inflammation following small pox immunizations in an older population with underlying if previously undiagnosed coronary heart disease.
Oxycyte does not result in direct platelet activation as measured by changes in platelet surface activated glycoprotein ("GP") IIb-IIIa, platelet surface P-selectin, monocyte-platelet aggregates, neutrophil-platelet aggregates, platelet-derived procoagulant particles, or whole blood platelet aggregation;
Procoagulant workup including protein S, protein C, antithrombin, urine homocysteine assays were normal.
In accordance with this, there is supporting evidence for a procoagulant effect of the complement system, which suggests that the coagulation cascade can be activated either directly or indirectly by complement (25).
5] The most significant hematological changes are physiologic anemia, neutrophilia, mild thrombocytopenia, increased procoagulant factors, and diminished fibrinolysis.
Hypoglycaemia has the potential to prompt episodes of syncope, ventricular tachyarrhythmias and cardiac arrest, induces a procoagulant and prothrombotic state, and, counterintuitively, creates a favourable environment for the development of atherosclerosis.