Prodigy

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Prodigy

(networking)
A commercial on-line conferencing service, co-developed by IBM and Sears, Roebuck, Inc.

Prodigy's main competitors are AOL and Compuserve.

Prodigy

An earlier online information service that provided access to the Internet, email and a variety of databases. Launched in 1988, Prodigy was the first consumer-oriented online service in the U.S. and one of the first to offer a graphics-based user interface (GUI) rather than text. The original service used proprietary software, but subsequent improvements produced an all-Internet service that used a Web browser. Founded as a partnership of IBM and Sears, Prodigy was acquired by International Wireless in 1996 and then by SBC Communications in 2001. In 2005, SBC merged with AT&T. See online service.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Hulbert attempts to capture the complicated lives of child prodigies without descending into voyeurism or caricature....
"It's a fascinating if at times disturbing chronicle of how 15 prodigies came to the world's attention--and at what cost.
And even the most seemingly well-adjusted prodigies don't exactly breeze through adolescence.
"We haven't identified the mutations, but we found that there's something in this region of chromosome 1 that is the same with both prodigies and their family members with autism," Bartlett said.
The Human Heredity study involved five child prodigies and their families that Ruthsatz has been studying, some for many years.
In addition, half of the prodigies had a family member or a first- or second-degree relative with an autism diagnosis.
Of the eight prodigies studied, three had a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders.
Meet nine child prodigies from three centuries, including Phillis Wheatley, Clara Schumann and Terence Tao.
He demonstrates the continuing importance of prodigies and wonders in political and religious discourse long after the Restoration.
Kenneson begins all this with "A Personal view," an enthusiastic reflection upon his own experience as a teacher of prodigies. Instrumental teachers and students will find the story of Shauna Rolston, who began studying with Kenneson before her third birthday, particularly revealing.
In the end, monsters, wonders, and prodigies, like all such marginalia so much now in vogue, can tell us much about the boundaries and limits of order and regularity, but little about the territory that lies within.
In her latest book, Ann Hulbert explores the lives of 15 brilliant child prodigies and the lessons they can provide.