prodigy house

prodigy house

One of a number of extravagant houses constructed in England at the beginning of the 17th century.
References in periodicals archive ?
"It not the biggest and it was never a 'Prodigy house' but its bigger than most and, perhaps most significantly, it's one of the least altered.
It is an Elizabethan prodigy house dating back to the early part of the 16th century with building first by Sir Rice Mansel and then in the second half of the century by Sir Edward Mansell.
There is also a superficial quality about much of this (accentuated by earth-shaking conclusions such as that the great prodigy houses of the age suggest that wealthy aristocrats liked "to proclaim their importance" [p.
Mark Girouard compellingly demonstrates how certain architectural elements in the halls, screens and heraldic glass of this period have lived on in numerous prodigy houses of Inns alumni.
Prodigy houses of Virginia; architecture and the native elite.
Because Elizabeth I (and, to a lesser extent, James I and Charles I) expected elaborate accommodation and entertainment at the homes of great land-owners, a building boom of "prodigy houses" began which continued into the 1630s.