proem


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Related to proem: prefaces

proem

an introduction or preface, such as to a work of literature
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather, in Parmenides' Proem, the reader finds an introduction to the general character of his work with colorful, resounding (9), and dynamic images, preparing the audience to listen to the goddess with the right mental disposition of attention (10).
In effect, this poem or proem, a combination of poetry and prose poetry, tells the story of a visual misunderstanding.
William Macdonald, who co-wrote the "Proem" to The Evergreens first number, sent an inscribed copy of the magazine to Beardsley as co-editor of The Yellow Book; he would have received this Scottish tribute just as he was being fired from his post after the arrest of Oscar Wilde in April 1895 (Houfe, Fin de Siecle 105).
Mann moves next to the proem to The Faerie Queene, which carefully renegotiates a famous hyperbaton in the first lines of Vergil's Aeneid, and she proceeds to Book VI, in which the same trope mediates the breaches in decorum met by, and brought on by, Calidore as the knight of Courtesy.
Zangwill begins with what he calls a "Proem" that openly links the "London Ghetto" with the shtetls of eastern Europe in a flowery, present-tense style notably different from the prose in the rest of the novel.
In Memoriam, he argues, is structured typologically, running backwards and forwards in time due to its dedication page marking the date of Hallam's death and its detached proem dated 1849 (the only section to bear a date) that recants all that follows.
In the proem you generate petroleum coke, which is a spongy residual concentrated with carbon, sulfur and heavy meas.
In the proem to a subsequent book of Imagines, penned by Philostratus the Elder's purported grandson (known today as Philostratus the Younger), the earlier work is explicitly defined as a "certain ekphrasis of works of painting" ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]); (14) likewise, a much later Byzantine commentary specifically adduced Philostratus the Elder's text as an example of the rhetorical trope.
Thus the volume's first essay--"The Decameron's All-Encompassing Discourse: Topoi of the Poet, Women, and Critics"--seeks to assess the Author's role in the Proem, next at the beginning of Day One, in the Introduction to Day Four, and in the Author's Conclusion at the end of the masterpiece.
The interplay between the seen and the unseen is a topic Spenser addresses throughout The Faerie Queene, and he comments directly on it in the proem to Book 2.